Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

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Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by A Needlepoint Dreary » Wed Oct 19, 2011 4:50 pm

I've seen a few people on this site saying how they've always dreamt of having a pet wolf. In fact, that seems to be one of the most common wishes of WQ members alike! So i've made this topic to discuss the domestication of wolves.
http://www.wildsentry.org/Hybrids.htm wrote:The wolf is the ancestor of all dog breeds that exist today. Wolves and dogs are very similar genetically, but the seemingly insignificant differences in their genetic structure create hormonal changes that result in vastly different behaviors.

Sometime between 20,000 and 100,000 years ago, a few wolves began scavenging around human encampments. Since that first association, humans have exerted great selective pressure (some consciously, some not) for canines that are less skittish, territorial, predatory and aggressive than wolves. Research has determined that the hormonal systems of canines with these traits (i.e. dogs) are different from those of wild canids. Those hormonal differences cause profound differences in behavior; they result in an animal that never really behaves like a mature canine. In a nutshell, a dog is a wolf in arrested development; they act very much like adolescent wolves their whole lives. An adolescent wolf is playful, adaptable, and able to form bonds with other species, takes directions readily, and is far less territorial and predatory than an adult wolf-all traits that make dogs such delightful companions. As an adolescent wolf's hormonal system reaches maturity (between 18 months and three years), it begins to exhibit all those normal adult behaviors that make wolves so difficult to deal with in captivity (see question #6).


Considering that wolves and dogs have such different behaviours, how could one raise a wolf? Would he raise one as a dog?

This is the question that puts many wolf-owners in trouble. Wolves are not as trainable as dogs are, and they're extremely territorial. No amount of selective breeding can remove that trait anytime soon.

Wolves are very independent and aloof creatures when around humans, especially strangers. They belong in the wild, where they came from. And they shouldn't be taken from it for ownership.

I support using wolves as learning tools in Refuge Parks and Universities, as long as proper care is provided.

So why own a wolf? Power? Pride? Fame?

You should only own a wolf if you're completely certified and have a vast knowledge in their behaviour. Wolves should be kept in groups, and should never be used as tools to strengthen your own emotional weaknesses.

So there's my opinion ... let's hear yours :3

Please, keep it clean here, and respect everybody's opinions. We all want an unbiased and friendly topic!
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Blightwolf » Thu Oct 20, 2011 1:10 am

A Needlepoint Dreary wrote:Considering that wolves and dogs have such different behaviours, how could one raise a wolf? Would he raise one as a dog?
You cannot raise a wolf as a dog. You cannot socialize or train a wolf like a dog, you can't feed them like a dog, and you certainly can't interact with them as if they were dogs. You can't even behave the same way around wolves and hybrids as you do with domestic canines. Being around wolves and wolfdogs has its own system, it's own world, its own 'code'. I wouldn't even dream of comparing regular dog ownership to wolf and hybrid ownership.
A Needlepoint Dreary wrote:I support using wolves as learning tools in Refuge Parks and Universities, as long as proper care is provided.

So why own a wolf? Power? Pride? Fame?

You should only own a wolf if you're completely certified and have a vast knowledge in their behaviour. Wolves should be kept in groups, and should never be used as tools to strengthen your own emotional weaknesses.
I completely agree with you. And yes; most people own wolves because they are seen as status symbols. People may think it's cool or 'macho' to own a potentially dangerous/exotic wild animal. People are drawn to the mysticism of the wolf. Unfortunately, that is never the right reason to own a non-domestic animal. Wolves do not make good pets. They simply cannot be assessed as pets. They can be taught certain behaviors, yes. They can be socialized. But wolves, or any other predatory animals kept as 'pets', no matter how well-behaved, docile, human-oriented, and 'tame' they seem, are never fully safe to keep around humans. And I'm speaking from experience. I've worked with high-content hybrids, I'm aware of the unpredictabilility and suspicious nature of these animals. They can never be trusted. I don't even trust the pups I have bottle-fed and taken naps with. I acknowledge the fact that they aren't 'just like dogs'. They aren't pets.

Anyone who fantasizes about wolf/wolfdog ownership, please take a moment to read this:
(This is for those with the misconception that it must be such a wonderful, beautiful and special experience to own wolves or hybrids.)

I have personally hand-raised two high-percentage wolf hybrids and the process was absolutely nothing like raising domestic pups. Unlike domestic dogs, wolves and hybrids have to be pulled from the mother at a very early age - I pulled both of the pups when they were three days old (to ensure they had the colostrum from the mother). And after that, it was the most exhausting, challenging and difficult period in my life. I had the responsibility of raising, socializing and training these pups; I had to make them both mentally and physically healthy individuals. I had to keep them isolated from adult canines (excluding short visits from their mother) so that they would properly imprint on me instead of imprinting on their mother. I had to bottle-feed them every three hours during the first week. They were 3½ weeks old when I began to feed them solid food. And then they had to be introduced to the pack (the presence of conspecifics is critical in the development of wolf and hybrid pups; they WILL suffer from behavioral problems if they are completely dependent on humans, they MUST have other canines, preferably other wolves and wolfdogs, around them as they grow). And even after the pups were moved to the enclosure and were now a part of the pack, I still had to continue their training and socialization - bottle-feeding is just the earliest stage of wolf/hybrid socialization. It doesn't stop there. Anywhere I went, I took the pups with me - they were in the car with me, they did grocery shopping with me, they walked in the city streets with me... everywhere. I let strange people hold and pet them. I introduced them to as many sounds, smells, sights, places, people (especially children, to reduce the risk of them fearing/viewing kids as a threat during the later stages of their lives) and other animals (including horses, since my family owns three, sheep and other livestock, dogs, cats, and rabbits). It was incredibly arduous - every day I made sure the pups experienced something new and positive.

And then the actual training - mastering basic commands and cut-off signals is absolutely vital. It's impossible to manage a hybrid wolf safely if it does not respond to its handler. They are very intelligent, and are extremely fast learners, but whereas dogs are content with a simple compliment from the owner, hybrids always want something in return. They will not perform tricks just to please you, unlike dogs. They do not seek a human's attention, approval, and affection in the same fashion as dogs. A lot of people FALSELY believe that wolves and hybrids have a so-called 'White Fang' syndrome; that they are loyal, trusting, and loving because they are social pack animals with a pack/family mentality. This is not true. Most hybrids do get socially attached to their caretakers and there is a certain 'bond' between the wolf and the human, but it's not same (or even similar) to the social interaction between dogs and humans. Dogs often dote upon their owners; hybrid wolves simply do not display the same degree of trust and affection.

The juvenile years were perhaps the most challenging. And it was also the only time when I literally wanted to give up and just stop working with them - it was that difficult. I'm not lying or exaggerating. There were even times when they were dangerous and aggressive towards me. Constantly charging at me, trying to intimidate; nipping at my hands and arms; trying to pull me to the ground by tearing at my clothes; showing their teeth and growling; flattening their ears and raising their hackles. They simply weren't the cute little pups anymore. But I had no other choice but to deal with this behavior; I knew the wolf in them was going to make an appearance at some point, and I had seen other hybrids go through the same phase. But I can't (and won't) deny how incredibly hard it was (physically and emotionally) to step into the same enclosure with an animal that is completely capable of badly injuring and even killing you. But all that, even the negativity, is normal lupine behavior. Anyone who cannot understand that should not own wolves and hybrids.

'My' hybrids did grow up to be balanced and healthy wolfdogs. It's one of the achievements that I am very proud of. But unfortunately, due to the owner's lack of expertise and sense of responsibility, most hybrids never get the chance to reach their full potential. They are great animals. But they don't make great pets. Never.

I do not think there is anything wrong with responsible wolf and hybrid ownership. But you need to be knowledgeable, dedicated and VERY financially prepared to own animals like wolves and wolfdogs. You also have to accept the risks - your animal CAN attack you, your friends, your other animals. It CAN escape its enclosure (the ONLY place a wolf should ever be kept in) and it CAN be dangerous. Most wolf owners are extremely immature and do not understand the risks. They rave about how lovely and magnificent their pet wolf is, how it is harmless and would never hurt anything or anyone etc. This is a very irresponsible and unhealthy approach to wolf ownership.
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Tarbtano » Thu Oct 20, 2011 11:15 am

All of WQ needs to read my friend Blightwolf's post right now before event thinking of replying to this thread.

Adding to what has been said by Blight, whom I completely agree with; there is one enormous factor I am familiar with through my training in taxonomic work that I must stress.

The North American Timber Wolf, the object of praise and affection in modern culture. It is immortalized in film (fictional and nonfictional), and the subject of other media from song, to this site's own game Wolfquest. THIS is the subspecies that comes to the mind of 98% of all people when they hear the world wolf.... This species...had absolutely...Nothing to do with the domestication of the domestic dog.

Attempting to tame a North American Timber Wolf and raise like a Labrador Retriever will be about as successful as raising an African Cape Buffalo (the most aggressive species of bovine in the world) as a domestic Jersey Cow.


All domestic dog breeds can trace their origins back to a small, timid; jackal like subspecies of wolf called the Indian Wolf (also called the Arabian Wolf). This species looks and acts completely differently from Timber Wolves, and yet they are wolves (species: Canis lupus) just the same. This species compared to the Timber Wolf is

1. half the size
2. much 'scrawnier'
3. has smaller teeth proportionally
4. almost never howls
5. bark even as adults
6. smaller brain
7. Less afraid of humans, but much more timid

You can't teach an animal to act like something its kind never became.
Going back to the example prior, just as the Domestic Cow came from the Aurochs and not the Buffalo, Dogs came from the Indian Wolf not the Timber Wolf.

And here's one big question. I see people often asking
Well, can I get a tame or domestic wolf?
My Response: You mean a DOG?
Last edited by Tarbtano on Thu Oct 20, 2011 5:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Blightwolf » Thu Oct 20, 2011 2:02 pm

Tarbtano wrote:And here's one big question. I see people often asking
Well, can I get a tame or domestic wolf?
My Response: You mean like a DOG?
Most people fail to comprehend the fact that dogs are genetically TAME while wolves are genetically WILD.
A 'pet' wolf living in captivity will not produce 'tame' offspring. Domestic canines, however, automatically produce offspring that are already genetically inclined to become human-oriented. Dogs have an innate tameness about them; something that is completely lacking in the wolf. You can still fully well succeed in socializing an older dog that has not had proper socialization as a pup, but when wolves cross a certain time limit (21 days, to be exact, which is an incredibly short time) it becomes impossible to try to make them imprint on humans. In other words, these wolves remain wild, instinctual, and therefore also unsafe and unmanageable by people. Don't get me wrong, socialized wolves are as instinctual and potentially dangerous as non-socialized wolves, and can be just as unpredictable, but the difference between a socialized, hand-raised wolf and a wolf with absolutely zero amount of socialization/training is that socialized wolves are actually manageable (when being handled appropriately, that is). But does the fact that they have been socialized mean they are safe and can be trusted? No. Does socialization make it easier to work with wolves? Absolutely. Does it reduce the risks involved working with an animal like the wolf? Yes, yes it does. Generally, it makes things safer and less stressful for everyone (especially for the animal itself). A socialized wolf, however, does not equal a 'domesticated wolf'. And in my opinion it doesn't even equal a 'tame' wolf. I think the word 'tolerant' is the best adjective to describe a captive/'pet' wolf. But the single reason why the animal is tolerant is because it has been conditioned and taught to be in the presence of people without feeling fear and avoidance. A socialized wolf's natural behaviors can be controlled through continuous training - but they cannot be removed from the wolf. It is still a wild animal, its instincts are still intact, and cannot be trained out of the wolf under any circumstances.

Another misleading belief among potential wolf or wolfdog owners is that once the animal has been socialized and trained it will automatically establish a similar social connection towards the human as it does with its conspecifics. That the wolf would view the human as a 'pack member'. People like Shaun Ellis and Cesar Millan would have you believe this to be true, but in reality this is complete nonsense. Wolves do not always form packs, contrary to popular beliefs, since packing behavior is not genetic; it is simply a developmental response to a particular habitat. Wolves only group together for practical reasons, because it enhances the chances of survival, and not because they can't survive without one, or because pack mentality is encoded in their DNA, and thus compulsory behavior. Even dogs (which are not even true pack animals, FYI) do not treat human families as their 'pack.' Humans are not a 'pack substitute' for dogs. Dogs exist in our social units, but is the human social unit the same thing as a pack? No, it is not, because the true concept of packing behavior means that the organism lives exclusively within a conspecific group (representatives of the same species). Humans obviously are not canids. Hence it makes absolutely no sense at all to believe that any social canine, be it a dog, a wolf, or a wolf hybrid, would perceive humans as conspecifics. So. You can own as many wolves as you like and get all egotistical about it and run around telling other people that your wolves are so social and trusting towards you that they have accepted you as a 'pack member'. But the fact remains; your wolf does not, and never will, see you as another wolf (and no, getting on all fours, eating raw meat, or making wolf-like vocalizations will not change this; people such as Mr. Ellis just apparently never realized this).
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Tarbtano » Thu Oct 20, 2011 5:28 pm

Here here. :P
Dogs do have a social unit, but unlike their wild ancestors; dogs instinctively think tend to of humans as both
1. dogs, abet weird looking ones; themselves
2. automatically of higher rank then themselves.

Wolves, no matter how much one acts like one; can not and do not see humans as one of their own.
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by jennmatt » Thu Oct 20, 2011 6:05 pm

I thought it would be cool to have a wolf, but now I consider it as animal abuse because they are wild animals. They are ment to be kept in the wild, no matter how strong your feelings about having a wolf as a pet, it just isn't right for them. Also, if an owner of a wolf lets it go into the wild, it would have lost its fear of humans and would be more likely to attack.
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Blightwolf » Fri Oct 21, 2011 2:01 am

Tarbtano wrote:Dogs do have a social unit, but unlike their wild ancestors; dogs instinctively think tend to of humans as both
1. dogs, abet weird looking ones; themselves
2. automatically of higher rank then themselves.

Wolves, no matter how much one acts like one; can not and do not see humans as one of their own.
Dominance is defined as 'an individual's ability to maintain or regulate access to some resources. It is not to be confused with status.' - Hinde (1967, 1970), Landau (1951), Rowell (1974), and Archer (1988). A dominant domestic dog is guarding its resources, and it has absolutely nothing to do with social 'ranks' or hierarchies. The flawed captive wolf studies were used to explain the behavior of domestic canines, because it was concluded that because the dog is the descendant of the wolf, it shares the same behavioral model. This early belief is highly inaccurate.

The wild wolf version of dominance is the 'drive directed towards the elimination of competition for a mate.' - Abrantes (1997). This definition does not apply to pet dogs; humans control (and in many cases, eliminate) when and/or whether our dogs will have a breeding partner. In fact, we control every single resource and regulate our dogs' access to them; food, toys, water, shelter etc. Because dogs live within human social units, they are not pack animals in the same sense as wolves.

It's very anthropomorphizing for a human to claim that dogs think of human families as 'packs', or see their owners as 'alphas'. The human concept of dominance is very different from that of the animal one. If our definition of dominance applied to dogs, it would mean that dogs would have a 'theory of mind', or the 'ability to adopt the perspective of others'. - Udell, Wynne (2008). This would consequently mean that a dog would be aware of his motives and the consequences of his actions to himself and others. There is no scientific evidence that dogs possess any of these capabilities. Humans can make conscious, logical decisions/choices whereas animals cannot. Animals develop strategies based on 'the greatest chance of reinforcement.' - Udell, Wynne (2008).

This is the one of the reasons why the 'traditional' meaning of dominance and dominant behavior does not apply to dogs. Animals are instinct-driven, humans are logic-driven; there is a vast difference. Therefore the animal dominance concept cannot possibly be the same thing as the human dominance concept.
jennmatt wrote:I thought it would be cool to have a wolf, but now I consider it as animal abuse because they are wild animals. They are ment to be kept in the wild, no matter how strong your feelings about having a wolf as a pet, it just isn't right for them. Also, if an owner of a wolf lets it go into the wild, it would have lost its fear of humans and would be more likely to attack.
Well, do you consider the ownership of cats, dogs and horses animal abuse? Bear in mind that all modern domestic animals used to be wild - the dog is the domesticated version of the wolf. Humans have been domesticating wild things since prehistorical times, and it has had a profound impact on our entire culture; it has changed our populations, settlement patterns, and even our technology. The domestication of animals has very a important cultural context.

I suppose this is a matter of personal preferences, though. Everyone is entitled to have their own opinion, of course, and we can't always agree with each other (and it would be quite boring if we did). I do acknowledge (and support) the fact that wild animals do not make suitable 'pets', but when it comes to responsible exotic animal ownership, I am not against it. As long as knowledgeable and dedicated people provide high-quality care for whatever animal that is kept in their property, I think it is fine to keep that animal. It's important, however, to make sure the animal is physically and psychologically balanced, and that the owner is fully informed on the animal's behavior and how to safely manage that animal. I do not support owning wild animals if the owner is an ignorant, irresponsible baffoon with a low self-esteem and wants to 'improve' their ego by doing something as idiotic as acquiring a potentially dangerous and powerful exotic 'pet' (tiger, wolf, bear, gorilla etc) just to boost that sense of self-actualization. But when the ownership is legal and the animals are well looked after, I personally do not see anything wrong or inappropriate about it. As long as people accept the risks, have proper education about the animal they want to own, purchase the animal legally, and are committed to its caretaking, it's a completely acceptable thing in my opinion. Exotic/wild animals still are not 'pets', even if they have great, professional owners, but if people can handle these animals responsibly, then let them.
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by -Radiance- » Fri Oct 21, 2011 6:23 am

Hmm..I think that it's ok to have a wolf as a pet ,but sadly not very safe. It seems like it would be cool to be the owner of a wolf but it really isn't a very good idea. Like all wild animals, wolves ,no matter how long you have had them, all are born with a wild instinct.
That's my opinon!
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Blightwolf » Fri Oct 21, 2011 6:30 am

-Radiance- wrote:Hmm..I think that it's ok to have a wolf as a pet ,but sadly not very safe. It seems like it would be cool to be the owner of a wolf but it really isn't a very good idea. Like all wild animals, wolves ,no matter how long you have had them, all are born with a wild instinct.
That's my opinon!
I respect your opinion, but could you further explain why exactly you believe wolf ownership would be 'cool'? What makes owning a wolf more 'cooler' than owning a pet dog, for example?
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Ayda Shakara » Fri Oct 21, 2011 8:12 am

My thoughts? Bad idea. Wolves are wild, and we need them as wild animals. Look at how people are trying to breed dogs and wolves together so that they can be tamed but still wild. Does that work? No! These "pet-wolves" are nothing but killing nature's creatures. We would be destroying the life of the wolf, the way it lives! These "pet-wolves", they wreck fences and backyards, and both interior and exterior of houses. They are dangerous as pets, and it is cruel.
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Blightwolf » Fri Oct 21, 2011 12:02 pm

Ayda Shakara wrote:These "pet-wolves", they wreck fences and backyards, and both interior and exterior of houses.
Who in their right mind would keep a wolf/hybrid inside their house? Low-content wolves can live inside houses, and it's recommended that high-content animals are socialized to indoor living as well so that they can also come into the house if/when necessary, but generally speaking, these animals should be kept outdoors throughout the year.

Hybrid wolves and wolves with responsible owners do not keep the animals chained in their backyards behind a fence. Not only is it inhumane to keep any animal permanently tethered, but it is also very unsafe, because the animals can escape due to the lack of a proper containment area. Wolfdogs and wolves require an enclosure - and I'm not referring to a simple outdoor dog kennel. Wolves require several acres of space. And the fence can't be made of regular chain-link mesh, either. People just don't seem to have even an ounce of common sense. It's impossible to own a wolf in the backyard in a suburban environment. It can only lead to absolute and utter disaster.
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Ayda Shakara » Fri Oct 21, 2011 7:23 pm

by Blightwolf » Fri Oct 21, 2011 1:02 pm : Who in their right mind would keep a wolf/hybrid inside their house? Low-content wolves can live inside houses, and it's recommended that high-content animals are socialized to indoor living as well so that they can also come into the house if/when necessary, but generally speaking, these animals should be kept outdoors throughout the year.

Hybrid wolves and wolves with responsible owners do not keep the animals chained in their backyards behind a fence. Not only is it inhumane to keep any animal permanently tethered, but it is also very unsafe, because the animals can escape due to the lack of a proper containment area. Wolfdogs and wolves require an enclosure - and I'm not referring to a simple outdoor dog kennel. Wolves require several acres of space. And the fence can't be made of regular chain-link mesh, either. People just don't seem to have even an ounce of common sense. It's impossible to own a wolf in the backyard in a suburban environment. It can only lead to absolute and utter disaster.
Well-spoken, Blight... I couldn't have said it any better.

Wolves are wild animals, and part of nature's one and only. You've seen what happens if a wolf-dog is treated improperly. Or created at all. Period. If you have no clue, look it up on YouTube. Trust me. What I say is true, and so is animal abuse. I acknowledge that all animals were once wild, but we have already tried to create a tame wolf. It's called the dog. After all, instead of creating "tame wolves", we may just end up killing them. We are humans, after all.
Wolves and dogs are so different. Sure, they're both canines. But, while dogs depend on humans for daily living, wolves depend on their pack, their natural resources, the environment around them, and their own, instinctive senses. Are you people trying to tell us members to do what has already been epically attempted and to possibly harm a wild animal? No thanks. No offense to y'all, 'cause I'm sure I'm offending some, but some people, much, um, not as nice as me but much less opinion-loaded, would be majorly offended.

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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Blightwolf » Sat Oct 22, 2011 2:26 am

Ayda Shakara wrote:Wolves are wild animals, and part of nature's one and only. You've seen what happens if a wolf-dog is treated improperly. Or created at all. Period. If you have no clue, look it up on YouTube. Trust me. What I say is true, and so is animal abuse. I acknowledge that all animals were once wild, but we have already tried to create a tame wolf. It's called the dog. After all, instead of creating "tame wolves", we may just end up killing them. We are humans, after all.
Wolves and dogs are so different. Sure, they're both canines. But, while dogs depend on humans for daily living, wolves depend on their pack, their natural resources, the environment around them, and their own, instinctive senses. Are you people trying to tell us members to do what has already been epically attempted and to possibly harm a wild animal? No thanks. No offense to y'all, 'cause I'm sure I'm offending some, but some people, much, um, not as nice as me but much less opinion-loaded, would be majorly offended.
As I stated before, we all have our opinions, and we should treat each other's opinions with respect, as well, even if you do not agree with them. I do not find your opinion offensive at all, Ayda, and I can understand the point you are trying to make.

I would personally never advertise wolves or hybrids as the 'ideal pets', and no one ever should. I would not, and will not, encourage anyone to buy one, either. I rather discourage people when it comes to wolf ownership than support it. They are dangerous, demanding, unpredictable, extremely strong, and generally a very bad animal to have as a 'pet'.
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by Ayda Shakara » Sat Oct 22, 2011 2:31 pm

Blightwolf wrote:
Ayda Shakara wrote:Wolves are wild animals, and part of nature's one and only. You've seen what happens if a wolf-dog is treated improperly. Or created at all. Period. If you have no clue, look it up on YouTube. Trust me. What I say is true, and so is animal abuse. I acknowledge that all animals were once wild, but we have already tried to create a tame wolf. It's called the dog. After all, instead of creating "tame wolves", we may just end up killing them. We are humans, after all.
Wolves and dogs are so different. Sure, they're both canines. But, while dogs depend on humans for daily living, wolves depend on their pack, their natural resources, the environment around them, and their own, instinctive senses. Are you people trying to tell us members to do what has already been epically attempted and to possibly harm a wild animal? No thanks. No offense to y'all, 'cause I'm sure I'm offending some, but some people, much, um, not as nice as me but much less opinion-loaded, would be majorly offended.
As I stated before, we all have our opinions, and we should treat each other's opinions with respect, as well, even if you do not agree with them. I do not find your opinion offensive at all, Ayda, and I can understand the point you are trying to make.

I would personally never advertise wolves or hybrids as the 'ideal pets', and no one ever should. I would not, and will not, encourage anyone to buy one, either. I rather discourage people when it comes to wolf ownership than support it. They are dangerous, demanding, unpredictable, extremely strong, and generally a very bad animal to have as a 'pet'.
- Whew - Glad it wasn't offensive. I'm not an offensive person. And I try to lead my posts the same way.
Anyway, Blight has made many great points thus far. I'm not sure how far this topic will go and how people will react to it. Truthfully.
Just try not to be rude or anything, and be sure your facts are supported. Don't be a loose cannon.
Yeah, I know I'm being bossy. :arrow: But I'm also right. :mrgreen:
I support those who are against wolves-as-pets. Thanks to those who rebel against it. Many, many thanks.
Thank you. :D
I'll gladly do a prophecy or poem for anyone who PMs me and asks for one ;]

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+Wolfie+
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Re: Wolves as Pets: Your Opinions.

Post by +Wolfie+ » Sat Oct 22, 2011 5:12 pm

Wolves are wild, You can't keep them as pets, and anyway, are they more pritty when you see them running through the snow? Or when their playing with thir pack? I like seing wolves in the wild! Not on a leash walking down the middle of the street, is wouldn't look right.

But i guess you could keep a cross breed, betwin and wolf and say i dont know, a husky, But just having a normal evry day wolf in your backyard, I dont think so, Wolves need a lot of space!

"You take the wolf out of the wild, but you can;t take the wild out of the wolf"
-----------------------------The Locked Hearts!-------------------

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