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Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 11:06 am
by Angel
I recently read in "Spirit of the Wolf" by Shaun Ellis that wolves can help portray their rank by growing darker, bolder fur. Especially around the eyes/muzzle and following the spine down to the tip of the tail. Although it seems plausible, I've seen many light coloured Alpha wolves who have an absence of bold markings.

Can anyone find any information to back this claim up? (EXCLUDING Shaun Ellis' studies)

Thanks!

Re: Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 11:09 am
by Songdog
I don't remember reading anything about this. I don't think that wolves can control the color of their fur.

In lions, a male with a darker mane has a better chance of attracting females. I don't know if this same principle works with wolves.

Are you sure your book wasn't fiction? The title sounds like a fiction book.

Re: Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 11:14 am
by Blindseer
I remember a previous question about this.

I think the answer had been no; though the more dominant wolves might get different levels of nutrients (such as those found in the liver) which might cause their fur patterns to be a bit darker.

they dont grow fur purposely to show dominance, though.

Re: Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 11:16 am
by Angel
Songdog wrote:I don't remember reading anything about this. I don't think that wolves can control the color of their fur.

In lions, a male with a darker mane has a better chance of attracting females. I don't know if this same principle works with wolves.

Are you sure your book wasn't fiction? The title sounds like a fiction book.
No, it's not a fiction book. He didn't mention anything about actually controlling their fur. It was more in regards to their diet.

Re: Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 11:32 am
by Blindseer
then it has nothing at all to do with dominance.
that would mean that it portrays diet instead of rank.

Re: Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Mon Dec 29, 2008 5:06 pm
by pawnee
I think Shaun explained it like this...wolves who are more dominant in a pack generaly get the best choices for food. Because they get the better quality pieces of the kill, it provides better nutrition...thus this affects the individual`s health. Like if you feed a dog omega acids and good food, their coat gets shiney because of the vitamins and minerals you provided....I don`t think Shaun meant that simply being a dominant wolf indicates that the animal directly gets a darker coat.

Re: Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Wed Dec 31, 2008 7:07 pm
by CLBaileyi
yes, this topic has already been discussed, but as some have explained, there is no relationship between the color of a wolf's coat and their "rank" in the pack (also, see other threads re: rank in wild wolves). There is no biological basis for this theory.

Re: Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Sat Jan 03, 2009 6:42 pm
by Twitchy_Katt
well i heard that a wolf's fur is determined not only by gnes but by habitat. it would be weird if we had a lot of more noticable black wolves in the mountains than gray wolves. thats my thoughts.

Re: Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 11:29 am
by wolfangle357
the shade of the wolves fur does not show its rank but it shows its age an older wolf has a lighter fur then a wolf who is younger to show the ranks is by its personality

Re: Wolf Fur Patterns Portraying Rank?

Posted: Thu Feb 19, 2009 9:24 pm
by CLBaileyi
the shade of the wolves fur does not show its rank but it shows its age an older wolf has a lighter fur then a wolf who is younger to show the ranks is by its personality


I am not sure if I am understanding you correctly, but the color of an older animal being "sometimes" lighter in color than a younger animal has nothing to do with showing its rank, based on age (i.e. a younger animal is automatically "dominant" over an older animal, or the opposite).