Death upon capture

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pawnee
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Death upon capture

Post by pawnee » Sun Nov 08, 2009 9:17 am

So in class we were disscussing how some animals die when captured by people...and how one wolf was trapped for some 12 hours, freaked out and dragged himslef all around the area and exhausted himself. A week later he died and researchers linked it to being captured and stressed out. It seems to happen more when tranquilizers are used too.

So I was wondering, if wolves can die from this post capture stress, why don't more researchers simply live handle the animals? Its been done in Quebec and Algonquin park and it means less time trying to revive a stressed out, over heated animal from a drug and less time away spent from a pack.

So...

do more researchers try and live handle and animal?
how are researchers limiting the death of subject animals?
what is the accepted mortality rate among test subjects?
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Re: Death upon capture

Post by Ebrithil » Sun Nov 08, 2009 1:50 pm

im guessing some researchers try to limit deaths by trying to make them less stressed. maybe by giving them food or something like that. i agree with you about the researchers doing it 'live handle' the animals. if you want to test them why not do it in their natural habitat? they would be less stressed as well.

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Re: Death upon capture

Post by Dragonwolffire » Tue Nov 17, 2009 8:58 pm

That must have been a sad death. I agree with you with how they shouldn't stress out the wolves like that and how live handling would be better for the wolf. But there are some circumstances that might make it hard to find a wolf. So baited traps would work better for the humans. If this is done they should take steps to improve the trapping so that the wolves feel, not as stressed (i don't think any wolf would feel good in a trap).

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Re: Death upon capture

Post by Evirith » Tue Jan 05, 2010 9:01 pm

That Is sad.

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Re: Death upon capture

Post by Cenetri » Tue Jan 05, 2010 9:18 pm

I'd think that live handling could be dangerous - unless you are considering a hand-raised wolf, or an animal that has adapted to human contact. If it were a stressed out, untamed wolf, it could be dangerous for the researchers. Though, there are some researchers that handle live animals... for example, Jane Goodall handled live, untamed gorillas - though it posed a huge danger in her part.

The stress levels in wild animals grow when many different events happen in a short period of time, such as the wolf being sedated, captured, and enclosed.

I'd expect that the mortality rate that they allow is a mid-center justification... because there are many different species that die from high stress levels, or from just being ill, confined, etc. For example, aquariums can't contain Great White Sharks for the same sort of reason.
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Re: Death upon capture

Post by Wolfie10 » Wed Jan 06, 2010 7:45 am

Him... Well to be quite honest I'm not surprised the stress levels get high. It really depends on the situation as to why the animals must be captured. Live handling could work, though I would supposed a drug of some sort would be needed... Again it really depends on the situation at hand.
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Re: Death upon capture

Post by ulogoni » Thu Jan 07, 2010 7:22 pm

This is otherwise known as capture myopathy, it can occur with or without the use of drugs, as wild animals being handled is extremely stressful for them.

You don't have to handle wolves to study them. There are groups out there that have been very successful using non-invasive methods. Raincoast Conservation Foundation out of British Columbia is one such organization. Their data comes from hair and scat samples, unobtrusive observation, and remote cameras. Howling surveys also work.

These days, radio collars are proving more and more to be a death sentence for wolves. Wildlife Services use what have been called "Judas wolves" to track down and kill entire wolf families for the livestock industry. They leave the collared wolves for last since that's the only wolf or wolves they can track, and use them to locate the other collarless wolves in the pack. Then they brutally gun them down from helicopters or fixed-wing aircraft. Four more entire packs are slated to be destroyed as we speak. These are the Elevation Pack, The Miners Lake Pack, The Battlefield Pack and the Mitchell Mountain Pack. Three of the Mitchell Mountain wolves have already been shot to death as of New Year's Eve.

In my opinion wolves are being studied to death. Because there is so much information out there, I was able to track down which wolves some remains belonged to a YEAR after they had died. There are reports and maps and other documents to help one find out the fates of hundreds and hundreds of wolves, if you but have the time and motivation to look. Even people who mean to do wolves harm have access to this information. Scary.

Any howls, there are ways to reduce capture myopathy (do a 'net search), but the best way is perhaps not to capture them at all. Unless one has a good, sound reason.

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Re: Death upon capture

Post by CLBaileyi » Tue Jan 12, 2010 4:55 pm

It really depends on the situation as to why the animals must be captured. Live handling could work, though I would supposed a drug of some sort would be needed... Again it really depends on the situation at hand.
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As stated above, each situation may require a particular method of restraint (either manual with animal awake, or chemical with animal anesthetised). The thing I would like to mention is that any self respecting wildlife researcher is very dedicated to the welfare and well-being of the animals that they are studying. I know it is sometimes hard to consider the need to get "hands on" with a wild animal in the field, but the people I have had the opportunity to work with for the past 20 years are very concerned about this issue and do their best for the animal. Some of the work and information about their ecology we have done with wolves and other species may require tagging/collaring the animal.

I know it may be a controversial topic for some, but without the collaring that is being done in Yellowstone NP and other areas is continuing to give valuable information to biologists. In my mind, you can never stop learning about something.
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Re: Death upon capture

Post by ulogoni » Wed Jan 13, 2010 2:17 pm

CLBaileyi wrote:I know it may be a controversial topic for some, but without the collaring that is being done in Yellowstone NP and other areas is continuing to give valuable information to biologists. In my mind, you can never stop learning about something.
Collaring in Yellowstone National Park doesn't carry as much risk for wolves as it does outside the park. Which is just as well, most of the research studies for the Northern Rockies populations occur there where there is time for meaningful research before death.

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