Pack life

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Pack life

Post by Catarinab » Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:59 am

When a wolf pack isn't hunting, mariking territory, patroling territory, taking care of pups, etc... what they do to don't get bored?

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Re: Pack life

Post by grape500 » Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:18 am

i think when they have spare time they play
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Re: Pack life

Post by Catarinab » Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:21 am

Um... and what are other things they do that aren't play to don't get bored?

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Re: Pack life

Post by grape500 » Wed Apr 21, 2010 12:15 pm

well they sleep (obviously i probably didn't need to say that) and i think they socalise other than that i can't think of anything
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Re: Pack life

Post by SolitaryHowl » Wed Apr 21, 2010 12:41 pm

Besides doing all of that, they usually sleep to conserve energy. Especially during the day when it's hot.

They can also howl and play with each other, though that has been said before.
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Re: Pack life

Post by CLBaileyi » Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:29 pm

I would just like to make a comment that in the sense you are talking, if I am correct, is that wolves don't get "bored" in the wild. There are so many things that they are exposed to and things they are faced with to simply survive, that there isn't alot of "time to be bored".

In captivity, however, this can be a challenge for wolf caretakers because we have taken away things like searching for shelter, food, avoiding predators and other threats, etc.
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Re: Pack life

Post by SolitaryHowl » Thu Apr 22, 2010 4:31 pm

So, Bailey, what would you do to prevent them from becoming bored or stressed? Do you ever release a rabbit or something in there so they can hunt it?
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Re: Pack life

Post by shadowwolf966 » Sun Apr 25, 2010 7:00 am

A rabbit??!
LOL, that would relieve bordeom, at least for me. :)

If I had to guess (this is just a guess, people) then I would assume they are playing and sleeping, like everyone before me has said.
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Re: Pack life

Post by Snowmuzzle » Fri Apr 30, 2010 4:56 pm

I second Bailey. A wild wolf can't afford to be off its guard for long enough to get bored. And if you take into account how much time they have to spend hunting and failing at it to get one successful kill, they don't have much time or energy to spare anyway. Life in the wild isn't as glorious as it's sometimes romanticised as being. It's not all running free and big drama: a wild animal has to go through a lot of hunger and fear in day-to-day life, and many don't survive to adulthood, let alone old age.
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Re: Pack life

Post by ara-tun » Sat May 22, 2010 6:42 pm

SolitaryHowl wrote:So, Bailey, what would you do to prevent them from becoming bored or stressed? Do you ever release a rabbit or something in there so they can hunt it?
In zoos that are associated with the AZA (Association of Zoos and Aquariums), predator and prey animals are never put in the same exhibit. This is because such a situation is considered unethical, as the prey animal will be in a constant state of stress and there is a high chance that the prey animal will wound the predator(s) when the predator "hunts" it. However, zoos are still required to provide at least some enrichment.

The zoo that I volunteered for would give the wolves "bloodsicles" from our rhino (I don't think I was ever told of his condition, but he'd get weekly blood draws that we'd give to the wolves once the vets were done with them) and occasionally the elephants and other large animals. Whenever the wolves were brought into their dens, volunteers and staff would spread new scents around their enclosure, add things like Christmas trees to their environment, and move things around. Sometimes, local farms will donate a carcass and the zoo will put the whole thing into the enclosure for the wolves.

To prevent wolves from getting stressed (this goes for all zoo mammals and birds), parts of their exhibits are out of sight to visitors so that the animals can hide.
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Re: Pack life

Post by SolitaryHowl » Sat May 22, 2010 9:17 pm

I didn't know about the enrichment part, but I knew of 'safe' areas for animals. Unfortunately, not all zoos are as humane as we'd like to believe.
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Re: Pack life

Post by Blightwolf » Sun May 23, 2010 2:14 am

I volunteer at a local wolf hybrid kennel. We offer enrichments, activities and entertainment by offering them various toys; different types of balls, chewing toys, pulling ribbons, as well as additional bones and meat (venison, beef, pork chops, pig ears, cow legs, lamb, liver, kidney, chicken and turkey) they can gnaw without the fear of the items causing digestive problems or other dangerous symptoms. They destroy the toys (specifically the chewing ones and the pulling ribbons) rather quickly so we must make sure we collect the scraps and the shredded pieces from the enclosures. Chopped wood or a wooden stick is also a very good source of entertainment but we must pay notice that the wolfdogs do not swallow any splinters that might damage their internal organs.

I think that it's fully possible to keep a captive wolf active in a similar way than you would keep a wolf hybrid or a regular domestic dog occupied. Wolves and hybrids require sturdier toys that can bear the impacts inflicted by their teeth and jaw power but you can always customize standard dog toys with more tolerable and enduring materials.

I have mixed and controversial feelings and opinions about the whole letting a loose rabbit or a deer run on wolf enclosures... that is the way wolves kill their prey in the wild - by chasing it. I think it would be a healthy way for the wolves to be able to do something recreational and realistic. Hunting is not only the way of surviving and getting food but it is also crucial mental stimulation, keeping the wolves content and in peak condition physically. However, I do understand how unethical and inhumane it is in a certain way. It is not right to cause unnecessary stress and panic for live prey items.
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Re: Pack life

Post by destiny3228 » Sun May 23, 2010 11:07 am

what color can pups be ? :D :D :D :D :?:

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Re: Pack life

Post by Canidae » Sun May 23, 2010 2:30 pm

destiny3228 wrote:what color can pups be ? :D :D :D :D :?:

I'll answer your question, but first, a few things:

First of all, it's considered SPAM to post several smilies in a row like that.

Second, please stay on-topic.

Third, if you have a question such as this, try reading the "Wolf Q&A: Frequently Asked Questions" thread that's stickied at the top of this forum.


Now, to answer your question, wolf pups are all born a brownish color, then as they age, their colors will change into what their adult fur patterns will look like.
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Re: Pack life

Post by Weakea » Sun May 30, 2010 10:21 pm

looks like everyone said was correct

wolves love to play with eachother and sleep more during the summer

when they gets bored, they also begins to bite eachother .. for fun too
lol

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