territory marking?

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territory marking?

Post by Bright-Heart » Tue Nov 29, 2011 10:01 pm

I've learned wolves will urinate along thier territory, but do they do so in a certian manner? such as along thier 'borders', or is it just random? and do they have other means of marking thier territory? such as clawing at a tree and making scratch marks, or even patroling to make sure other wolves aren't near?
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Re: territory marking?

Post by BlackWarrior » Tue Nov 29, 2011 10:34 pm

This is a fantastic link to learn about wolves and their territories/scent marking. It is highly suggested you read a large portion of it. Farther down in the article is where you will find the main way wolves mark out their territory.

Source >> http://alphawolfsabrina.webs.com/theterritory.htm

Wolves use many methods to define their territories. In territories that are well defined, the most important method wolves use to mark out their territory is scent marking . Wolves use urine to mark out their territory, and wolves can differentiate the odour of their packmate's urine from a foreign wolf's urine. Wolves have excellent senses of smell, and when a pack ventures onto a territory that has been marked by other wolves, the pack will either leave or risk a fight. Wolves are rarely tolerant of foreign wolves, although R.D. Lawrence, in his book, Trail of the Wolf, does describe a few instances of friendly relations between two different wolf packs.

When a wolf marks its territory, it will raise one of its hind legs and will squirt a small amount of urine on a scent post (usually a raised object like a tree, rock, or bush). This raised leg urination (RLU) is different from ordinary urination, where the wolf will squat on the ground. RLU is usually only performed by dominant wolves (both male and female) although it is usually the dominant male that most commonly performs RLU's. The dominant female usually marks on a scent post that her mate has just marked, although during breeding season, the female may urinate first on the ground. All other females in the pack, as well as low ranking males and young wolves, will squat when they urinate, although exceptions to this rule sometimes occur. Candace Savage, in the book, The Nature of Wolves, mentions that all of the wolves in a pack sometimes mark a certain spot, and that when this occurs, the wolves will wait in line for their turn to mark the spot. Lone wolves almost never perform RLU's so packs do not discover their presence.

High ranking wolves will leave urine marks about every 350 meters when they are marking out their territory. Wolves will also mark the same scent post over and over again. It is sometimes claimed that wolves scent mark to mark out the boundaries of their territories, although some authors (see Lawrence, 1997) claim that wolves do not scent mark to mark out territory boundaries, since the boundaries of a wolf pack are rarely clear and rigid. Instead, wolves may scent mark simply to alert other packs that there are already wolves in the area. The scent marks are like "No Trespassing!" signs for wolves.

Wolves will often place scent marks on spots where other wolves, coyotes, foxes, skunks, racoons, moose, deer and other animals have left marks of urine. Domestic dogs often do that as well. It seems that the scent of any animal on a spot stimulates a wolf to add its own mark to the spot.

A wolf may also rub its lips and neck on a tree or against the ground to mark its territory, and wolves often scrape their paw pads on the ground (usually after they urinate) to mark a territory. This releases odours from the glands in the wolf's paws. Wolves also howl to warn other wolf packs that they have entered foreign territory. Wolves will often answer the howls of another wolf pack. However, wolves will remain quiet if there are pups present so they don't attract attention to the pup's whereabouts. Wolf pups are vulnerable to attacks from large predators, such as bears or mountain lions.


Hope I was of help!
And the link shall answer the rest. ^^


Please note: Wolf packs do not have "ranks" althought the process of scent marking stated above is accurate, i do believe that "ranks" is now an outdated term. =]
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Re: territory marking?

Post by WolvesOfTheSeas » Mon Apr 30, 2012 7:26 am

BlackWarrior wrote:This is a fantastic link to learn about wolves and their territories/scent marking. It is highly suggested you read a large portion of it. Farther down in the article is where you will find the main way wolves mark out their territory.

Source >> http://alphawolfsabrina.webs.com/theterritory.htm

Wolves use many methods to define their territories. In territories that are well defined, the most important method wolves use to mark out their territory is scent marking . Wolves use urine to mark out their territory, and wolves can differentiate the odour of their packmate's urine from a foreign wolf's urine. Wolves have excellent senses of smell, and when a pack ventures onto a territory that has been marked by other wolves, the pack will either leave or risk a fight. Wolves are rarely tolerant of foreign wolves, although R.D. Lawrence, in his book, Trail of the Wolf, does describe a few instances of friendly relations between two different wolf packs.

When a wolf marks its territory, it will raise one of its hind legs and will squirt a small amount of urine on a scent post (usually a raised object like a tree, rock, or bush). This raised leg urination (RLU) is different from ordinary urination, where the wolf will squat on the ground. RLU is usually only performed by dominant wolves (both male and female) although it is usually the dominant male that most commonly performs RLU's. The dominant female usually marks on a scent post that her mate has just marked, although during breeding season, the female may urinate first on the ground. All other females in the pack, as well as low ranking males and young wolves, will squat when they urinate, although exceptions to this rule sometimes occur. Candace Savage, in the book, The Nature of Wolves, mentions that all of the wolves in a pack sometimes mark a certain spot, and that when this occurs, the wolves will wait in line for their turn to mark the spot. Lone wolves almost never perform RLU's so packs do not discover their presence.

High ranking wolves will leave urine marks about every 350 meters when they are marking out their territory. Wolves will also mark the same scent post over and over again. It is sometimes claimed that wolves scent mark to mark out the boundaries of their territories, although some authors (see Lawrence, 1997) claim that wolves do not scent mark to mark out territory boundaries, since the boundaries of a wolf pack are rarely clear and rigid. Instead, wolves may scent mark simply to alert other packs that there are already wolves in the area. The scent marks are like "No Trespassing!" signs for wolves.

Wolves will often place scent marks on spots where other wolves, coyotes, foxes, skunks, racoons, moose, deer and other animals have left marks of urine. Domestic dogs often do that as well. It seems that the scent of any animal on a spot stimulates a wolf to add its own mark to the spot.

A wolf may also rub its lips and neck on a tree or against the ground to mark its territory, and wolves often scrape their paw pads on the ground (usually after they urinate) to mark a territory. This releases odours from the glands in the wolf's paws. Wolves also howl to warn other wolf packs that they have entered foreign territory. Wolves will often answer the howls of another wolf pack. However, wolves will remain quiet if there are pups present so they don't attract attention to the pup's whereabouts. Wolf pups are vulnerable to attacks from large predators, such as bears or mountain lions.


Hope I was of help!
And the link shall answer the rest. ^^


Please note: Wolf packs do not have "ranks" althought the process of scent marking stated above is accurate, i do believe that "ranks" is now an outdated term. =]
Yes i agree with BW wolves do define there territory because next thing you know a another comes and kill that pack so it for there own safety :)

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Re: territory marking?

Post by Croix » Mon Apr 30, 2012 7:40 am

WolvesOfTheSeas wrote:
BlackWarrior wrote:This is a fantastic link to learn about wolves and their territories/scent marking. It is highly suggested you read a large portion of it. Farther down in the article is where you will find the main way wolves mark out their territory.

Source >> http://alphawolfsabrina.webs.com/theterritory.htm

Wolves use many methods to define their territories. In territories that are well defined, the most important method wolves use to mark out their territory is scent marking . Wolves use urine to mark out their territory, and wolves can differentiate the odour of their packmate's urine from a foreign wolf's urine. Wolves have excellent senses of smell, and when a pack ventures onto a territory that has been marked by other wolves, the pack will either leave or risk a fight. Wolves are rarely tolerant of foreign wolves, although R.D. Lawrence, in his book, Trail of the Wolf, does describe a few instances of friendly relations between two different wolf packs.

When a wolf marks its territory, it will raise one of its hind legs and will squirt a small amount of urine on a scent post (usually a raised object like a tree, rock, or bush). This raised leg urination (RLU) is different from ordinary urination, where the wolf will squat on the ground. RLU is usually only performed by dominant wolves (both male and female) although it is usually the dominant male that most commonly performs RLU's. The dominant female usually marks on a scent post that her mate has just marked, although during breeding season, the female may urinate first on the ground. All other females in the pack, as well as low ranking males and young wolves, will squat when they urinate, although exceptions to this rule sometimes occur. Candace Savage, in the book, The Nature of Wolves, mentions that all of the wolves in a pack sometimes mark a certain spot, and that when this occurs, the wolves will wait in line for their turn to mark the spot. Lone wolves almost never perform RLU's so packs do not discover their presence.

High ranking wolves will leave urine marks about every 350 meters when they are marking out their territory. Wolves will also mark the same scent post over and over again. It is sometimes claimed that wolves scent mark to mark out the boundaries of their territories, although some authors (see Lawrence, 1997) claim that wolves do not scent mark to mark out territory boundaries, since the boundaries of a wolf pack are rarely clear and rigid. Instead, wolves may scent mark simply to alert other packs that there are already wolves in the area. The scent marks are like "No Trespassing!" signs for wolves.

Wolves will often place scent marks on spots where other wolves, coyotes, foxes, skunks, racoons, moose, deer and other animals have left marks of urine. Domestic dogs often do that as well. It seems that the scent of any animal on a spot stimulates a wolf to add its own mark to the spot.

A wolf may also rub its lips and neck on a tree or against the ground to mark its territory, and wolves often scrape their paw pads on the ground (usually after they urinate) to mark a territory. This releases odours from the glands in the wolf's paws. Wolves also howl to warn other wolf packs that they have entered foreign territory. Wolves will often answer the howls of another wolf pack. However, wolves will remain quiet if there are pups present so they don't attract attention to the pup's whereabouts. Wolf pups are vulnerable to attacks from large predators, such as bears or mountain lions.


Hope I was of help!
And the link shall answer the rest. ^^


Please note: Wolf packs do not have "ranks" althought the process of scent marking stated above is accurate, i do believe that "ranks" is now an outdated term. =]
Yes i agree with BW wolves do define there territory because next thing you know a another comes and kill that pack so it for there own safety :)
WolvesOfTheSeas, unless you are going to add on and provide new information to the answer that BlackWarrior provided, please do not repeat answers as can be considered SPAM. Thank you. c:

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Re: territory marking?

Post by BlackWarrior » Sun May 06, 2012 11:40 pm

It seems the questions has been answered any way, so to prevent repeating answers, I will go ahead and lock this. :)
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