Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

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Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by pawnee » Fri Mar 20, 2009 8:37 pm

Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told
Livestock kills on the rise in Ontario
March 20, 2009
BY John Carter

Farmers having problems with wildlife attacking livestock and damaging their crops should consider allowing hunters on their property or apply for a permit to shoot the predators themselves.

They were among the suggestions offered at a special meeting hosted by the Renfrew County Federation of Agriculture March 9 to discuss what many farmers feel is inadequate compensation for predator kills.

With a compensation rate increase unlikely in the unsettled economic climate, the three speakers concentrated on advising farmers how to deter wildlife damage.

About 75 people attended the meeting at Opeongo High School to hear Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs sheep specialist Anita O’Brien, Ministry of Natural Resources fish and wildlife technical specialist Don Lewis and MNR conservation officer Mark Lamont address the problem.

Lamont said nuisance animal provisions in the Fish & Wildlife Conservation Act allow landowners to capture, kill or harass wildlife if they have reasonable grounds to believe they are damaging, or about to damage, their property. But they have to do it on their own land or property they lease, not someone else’s, he stressed.

Farmers can also grant hunters access to their property, he said. “They can help you solve your problem.” However, they can’t kill moose, elk or caribou, he added.

Furthermore, hunters and farmers need to be aware of new endangered species legislation and tougher animal cruelty regulations, Lamont said. He noted an area person was recently charged with drowning a skunk. “You can’t drown land animals ... and you can’t use adhesives or poisons to get rid of predators,” he pointed out.

Lewis suggested farmers contact local fish and game clubs to find potential hunters. He noted the rising number of deer in the region have lost their fear of humans. “We need to bring that fear back,” he said.

The MNR can also send out licenced trappers to help farmers with problem predators, he added.

One farmer said that when he asked about compensation for damage done by wild turkeys, he was told the MNR was “so poor they can’t afford to put gas in their trucks.”

“Where’s the $1.4 million they collect from hunters?” he asked, adding he has been pestered by turkeys for the last four months.

Lamont said that if a farmer has a bona fide problem, he will be permitted to shoot a couple of turkeys to scare them away. However, for migratory birds such as geese and gulls, you have to apply for a shooting permit from the federal environment ministry, he explained.

“It’s a very good program ... it worked well for me,” a farmer who had a problem with geese told the group. “I got a permit right away.”

Lewis said well-trained dogs, propane cannons, raptor kites, red streamers and electric fences can also help deter predatory attacks.

O’Brien pointed out that in response to a major rise in livestock killed by coyotes and wolves in Ontario in the early-1990s, the ministry arranged for a half dozen trappers to go into the hardest-hit areas. The trapping helped alleviate the problem for a time, but since 2004 the predation rates have become to climb steadily again, she said.

The pay-out for livestock kills more than doubled between 2005 and 2008.

O’Brien was asked about harassment compensation. “Not for cattle, but there is for sheep,” she said. “I don’t know why because I’ve seen cattle harassed by coyotes just like sheep.”

Some veterinarian bills are covered by the compensation program, she added.

O’Brien explained that the province pays for livestock killed by coyotes and wolves, but local taxpayers pay for dog kills. The provincial program also does not cover livestock killed by smaller predators, such as fox, fishers and raccoons, she said.

The coyote-wolf program is run through municipalities, which hire evaluators to determine if the animal was killed by wildlife and how much compensation is justified. There is an appeal process, but not for bear kills, as that compensation is paid out directly from the province.

O’Brien said the evaluation policy was reviewed in the mid-1990s and changes made to improve consistency about the province.

She urged farmers to ensure they retrieve remains of the victims. Knowing an animal has been killed by a predator, but not being able to prove it “is pretty upsetting to the producer, but the evaluator needs evidence,” she said.

john.carter@metroland.com
http://yourarnprior.com/article/11216
hmmmm. so the goverment of Ontario says that most livestock conflicts happen in 'coyote area' range in Ontario and yet the wolf gets a bad rap? Theres also no data as to how many wolves are killed in the name of livestock protection in Ontario....seems like more research needs to be taken up....
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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by Cerbolt » Fri Mar 20, 2009 8:46 pm

I am going to write a letter to that Ontario Goverment!
Darn those Coyotes...
(My mom said no too the Letter D=

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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by pawnee » Fri Mar 20, 2009 8:48 pm

well theres always email. Theres a great thread in the Take Action forum for tips on writing letters :mrgreen:
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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by Cerbolt » Fri Mar 20, 2009 9:02 pm

But why do they always jump to the wolves, I bet coyotes eat most of the livestock because they are scavengers, wolves are too but at least they hunt for there food.

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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by pawnee » Fri Mar 20, 2009 9:08 pm

coyotes are also skillful hunters too.

Its just that Ontario needs more data into how many wolves are being killed in relation to livestock problems and how it can be prevented. I`ve tried getting info but I`ve seen nothing in which the Ontario goverment is trying to prevent livetsock losses to begin with....it starts with education, research and implementing what people have learned into actual workable programs.
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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by Cerbolt » Fri Mar 20, 2009 9:11 pm

Darn Ontario Goverment...
But at least near Borden Military no one is allowed to trustpass so the wilflife can be safe.

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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by twilightfanpire » Fri Mar 20, 2009 9:16 pm

i think no animale should be killed! if the livestock people are getting mad, mabe they should protect there stock better. like with electric fences and such.

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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by pawnee » Sat Mar 21, 2009 7:35 am

well it may not be the farmer's fault, but I think the Ontario MNR should update the way they handle livestock conflicts....it seems kind of outdated.
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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by Cerbolt » Sat Mar 21, 2009 7:44 am

I agree. No these days every thing is going out of wack due to the ecomeny.

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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by king1-7 » Sat Mar 21, 2009 10:59 am

Hm, that's a new idea...Hunters-for-hire?

And yeah, it does seem kind of fishy that they're automatically pointing their fingers at wolves. I wonder if there's been a tally taken recently that compares the number of coyote predations with the number of wolf predations...
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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by pawnee » Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:13 am

Defense of Property and Public Safety
Members of the public can kill wolves in defense of personal property, such as livestock
or domestic pets, or in response to public safety concerns. The number of wolves killed
in this manner is unknown as there are no reporting requirements in place. Actual
numbers are likely small as wolves generally do not occur in close proximity to people,
and coyotes or hybrids frequent agricultural and developed areas.
3.3.2. Predation on Domestic Animals
In 2002/2003, OMAF reported paying $607,168 in compensation for 1,914 livestock
predation claims attributed to wolves/coyotes under the Livestock, Poultry and Honey
Bee Protection Act. The 1,914 claims represented a total loss of 3,752 individual
animals, including several hundred chickens through several claims. Figure 1 illustrates
the distribution of total compensation paid by County. The highest levels of
compensation were paid in coyote-only range or in areas where both wolves and
coyotes are present.

High numbers of wild canids live in close proximity to farms. In spite of this, usually only
a fraction of these may become implicated in the killing or injuring of livestock. When
predation does begin to occur, the predators involved may significantly impact on a
particular livestock production while adjacent farms may remain unaffected. Predation
can also occur in areas and at times where natural foods seem to be plentiful.
The number of small pets, particularly cats, reportedly killed by "wild" canids in
suburban and rural areas has increased in recent years. It is usually difficult to confirm
the identity of the predators involved in these killings because these incidents are
seldom witnessed, but they are likely caused by coyotes. OMNR staff do occasionally
receive reports of domestic dogs being killed by wolves in more remote locations.

http://www.web2.mnr.gov.on.ca/mnr/ebr/w ... ounder.pdf

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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by king1-7 » Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:23 am

Oh hey, I've seen that before. XD So the coyotes do seem to be a little more responsible...interesting.
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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by Wolf+Freedom=Me » Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:40 am

thats not fair! what if ALL the predators go onto the farmers' turf, then they ALL would get shot! besides, if a couple of sheep go missing then so what? there's going to be a shortage of wool sweaters?! Wool sweaters are so itchy! c'mon people! it's like someone going into McDonald's looking for a good burger and getting shot for it! Think alive people! The predators are simply just looking for an easy, catchable meal. If anything, they should put up more protective fencing! :|
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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by king1-7 » Sun Mar 22, 2009 12:34 pm

Wolf+Freedom=Me wrote:thats not fair! what if ALL the predators go onto the farmers' turf, then they ALL would get shot! besides, if a couple of sheep go missing then so what? there's going to be a shortage of wool sweaters?! Wool sweaters are so itchy! c'mon people! it's like someone going into McDonald's looking for a good burger and getting shot for it! Think alive people! The predators are simply just looking for an easy, catchable meal. If anything, they should put up more protective fencing! :|
For most farmers, their animals are the only things that enable them to make a living. If their animals are killed, the farmers lose money, and sometimes a lot of it. (You can compare it to being unemployed for a certain amount of time.)

However, I do think you make a good comparison with the McDonald's thing...
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Re: Hunters can help with predator problems, farmers told

Post by Wolf+Freedom=Me » Mon Mar 23, 2009 4:54 am

king1-7 wrote:
Wolf+Freedom=Me wrote:thats not fair! what if ALL the predators go onto the farmers' turf, then they ALL would get shot! besides, if a couple of sheep go missing then so what? there's going to be a shortage of wool sweaters?! Wool sweaters are so itchy! c'mon people! it's like someone going into McDonald's looking for a good burger and getting shot for it! Think alive people! The predators are simply just looking for an easy, catchable meal. If anything, they should put up more protective fencing! :|
For most farmers, their animals are the only things that enable them to make a living. If their animals are killed, the farmers lose money, and sometimes a lot of it. (You can compare it to being unemployed for a certain amount of time.)

However, I do think you make a good comparison with the McDonald's thing...

thanks! but if the farmers are so worried about losing their livestock then why not put up more fencing and hire more herding dogs.. the kind that scare off predators? It'd be like the farmers teasing the carnivorous animals, saying.. "hey! over here buddy! want a nice lamb-chop? when you come in for a bite I'll shoot chya!" it's still not fair in MY opinion.. It's like scubba diving in an ocean in the middle of a shark feeding frenzy. The sharks can't help from eating fish.. it's THEIR prey and as long as the prey are living you really can't claim it as yours. I'm really good with metaphors and symallies aren't I? :lol:
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