General Tiger Discussion

Talk about nature and wildlife you've seen or read about. Discuss specific plants, animals, natural places and wildlife in general, or follow the instructions in the Nature & Wildlife Photography forum to submit your own wildlife photographs.

Moderators: Isela, Koa

What do you think of tigers, before and after you read the information?

Before I read the information: Majestic creatures
45
55%
Before I read the information: Man-Eating beasts
2
2%
After I read the information: Majestic creatures
35
43%
After I read the information: Man-eating beasts
0
No votes
 
Total votes: 82

User avatar
Mezzanota
Adult Wolf
Adult Wolf
Posts: 1082
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2008 11:21 am
Gender: Female
Location: In your head

General Tiger Discussion

Post by Mezzanota » Mon Jul 06, 2009 9:00 am

Tigers are my favourite animals, and as most people probably know they are endangered. So I wanted to write something based on my opinion on tigers, using a little help from Wikipedia. If there's something wrong, then OK, mods can lock it. So here it goes:

Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-Eating Beasts?

The tiger (panthera tigris) are related to the domestic cat, which makes them felids. They do NOT live in Africa beside the lion, but they live in Asia. They are Apex Predators - this means, they are not hunted by any animals other than humans. They are known for their orange fur, black stripes and power. Here is the link to a map of the tiger's historical range and tiger's present range (where tigers lived in the past and where tigers live in now):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... er_map.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ution3.PNG

Although it may be hard to believe, tiger's can't climb trees; they're too heavy, though cubs can. They also actually love water, and they can.


_________________________
Here is something copy and pasted from Wikipedia about Tiger subpecies:
Wikipedia wrote: Subspecies
There are eight recent subspecies of tiger, two of which are extinct. Their historical range (severely diminished today) ran through Bangladesh, Siberia, Iran, Afghanistan, India, China, and southeast Asia, including some Indonesian islands. The surviving subspecies, in descending order of wild population, are:

Bengal tiger

The Bengal tiger or the Royal Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) is found in parts of India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Burma. It lives in varied habitats: grasslands, subtropical and tropical rainforests, scrub forests, wet and dry deciduous forests, and mangroves. Males in the wild usually weigh 205 to 227 kg (450–500 lb), while the average female will weigh about 141 kg.[19] However, the northern Indian and the Nepalese Bengal tigers are somewhat bulkier than those found in the south of the Indian Subcontinent, with males averaging around 235 kilograms (520 lb).[19] While conservationists already believed the population to be below 2,000,[20] the most recent audit by the Indian Government's National Tiger Conservation Authority has estimated the number at just 1,411 wild tigers (1165–1657 allowing for statistical error), a drop of 60% in the past decade.[21] Since 1972, there has been a massive wildlife conservation project, known as Project Tiger, to protect the Bengal tiger. The project is considered as one of the most successful wildlife conservation programs[citation needed], though at least one Tiger Reserve (Sariska Tiger Reserve) has lost its entire tiger population to poaching.[22]


Indochinese tiger

The Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti), also called Corbett's tiger, is found in Cambodia, China, Laos, Burma, Thailand, and Vietnam. These tigers are smaller and darker than Bengal tigers: Males weigh from 150–190 kg (330–420 lb) while females are smaller at 110–140 kg (242–308 lb). Their preferred habitat is forests in mountainous or hilly regions. Estimates of the Indochinese tiger population vary between 1,200 to 1,800, with only several hundred left in the wild. All existing populations are at extreme risk from poaching, prey depletion as a result of poaching of primary prey species such as deer and wild pigs, habitat fragmentation and inbreeding. In Vietnam, almost three-quarters of the tigers killed provide stock for Chinese pharmacies.


Malayan tiger

The Malayan tiger (Panthera tigris jacksoni), exclusively found in the southern part of the Malay Peninsula, was not considered a subspecies in its own right until 2004. The new classification came about after a study by Luo et al. from the Laboratory of Genomic Diversity Study,[23] part of the National Cancer Institute of the United States. Recent counts showed there are 600–800 tigers in the wild, making it the third largest tiger population, behind the Bengal tiger and the Indochinese tiger. The Malayan tiger is the smallest of the mainland tiger subspecies, and the second smallest living subspecies, with males averaging about 120 kg and females about 100 kg in weight. The Malayan tiger is a national icon in Malaysia, appearing on its coat of arms and in logos of Malaysian institutions, such as Maybank.


Sumatran tiger
The Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) is found only on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, and is critically endangered.[24] It is the smallest of all living tiger subspecies, with adult males weighing between 100–140 kg (220–308 lb) and females 75–110 kg (154–242 lb).[25] Their small size is an adaptation to the thick, dense forests of the island of Sumatra where they reside, as well as the smaller-sized prey. The wild population is estimated at between 400 and 500, seen chiefly in the island's national parks. Recent genetic testing has revealed the presence of unique genetic markers, indicating that it may develop into a separate species,[specify] if it does not go extinct.[26] This has led to suggestions that Sumatran tigers should have greater priority for conservation than any other subspecies. While habitat destruction is the main threat to existing tiger population (logging continues even in the supposedly protected national parks), 66 tigers were recorded as being shot and killed between 1998 and 2000, or nearly 20% of the total population.


Siberian tiger

The Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), also known as the Amur, Manchurian, Altaic, Korean or North China tiger, is confined to the Amur-Ussuri region of Primorsky Krai and Khabarovsk Krai in far eastern Siberia, where it is now protected. Considered the largest subspecies, with a head and body length of 190–230 cm (the tail of a tiger is 60–110 cm long) and an average weight of around 227 kilograms (500 lb) for males,[19] the Amur tiger is also noted for its thick coat, distinguished by a paler golden hue and fewer stripes. The heaviest wild Siberian tiger on record weighed in at 384 kg,[27] but according to Mazak these giants are not confirmed via reliable references.[15] Even so, a six-month old Siberian tiger can be as big as a fully grown leopard. The last two censuses (1996 and 2005) found 450–500 Amur tigers within their single, and more or less continuous, range making it one of the largest undivided tiger populations in the world. Genetic research in 2009 demonstrated that the Siberian tiger, and the western "Caspian tiger" (once thought to have been a separate subspecies that became extinct in the wild in the late 1950s[28][29]) are actually the same subspecies, since the separation of the two populations may have occurred as recently as the past century due to human intervention.[30]


South China tiger

The South China tiger (Panthera tigris amoyensis), also known as the Amoy or Xiamen tiger, is the most critically endangered subspecies of tiger and is listed as one of the 10 most endangered animals in the world.[31][clarification needed] One of the smaller tiger subspecies, the length of the South China tiger ranges from 2.2–2.6 m (87–100 in) for both males and females. Males weigh between 127 and 177 kg (280–390 lb) while females weigh between 100 and 118 kg (220–260 lb). From 1983 to 2007, no South China tigers were sighted.[32] In 2007 a farmer spotted a tiger and handed in photographs to the authorities as proof.[32][33] The photographs in question, however, were later exposed as fake, copied from a Chinese calendar and photoshopped, and the “sighting” turned into a massive scandal.[34][35][36]
In 1977, the Chinese government passed a law banning the killing of wild tigers, but this may have been too late to save the subspecies, since it is possibly already extinct in the wild. There are currently 59 known captive South China tigers, all within China, but these are known to be descended from only six animals. Thus, the genetic diversity required to maintain the subspecies may no longer exist. Currently, there are breeding efforts to reintroduce these tigers to the wild.

Extinct subspecies


A hunted down Balinese tiger

The Balinese tiger (Panthera tigris balica) was limited to the island of Bali. They were the smallest of all tiger subspecies, with a weight of 90–100 kg in males and 65–80 kg in females.[15] These tigers were hunted to extinction—the last Balinese tiger is thought to have been killed at Sumbar Kima, West Bali on 27 September 1937; this was an adult female. No Balinese tiger was ever held in captivity. The tiger still plays an important role in Balinese Hinduism.

Javan Tiger

The Javan tiger (Panthera tigris sondaica) was limited to the Indonesian island of Java. It now seems likely that this subspecies became extinct in the 1980s, as a result of hunting and habitat destruction, but the extinction of this subspecies was extremely probable from the 1950s onwards (when it is thought that fewer than 25 tigers remained in the wild). The last confirmed specimen was sighted in 1979, but there were a few reported sightings during the 1990s.[37][38] With a weight of 100-141 kg for males and 75-115 kg for females, the Javan tiger was one of the smaller subspecies, approximately the same size as the Sumatran tiger
___________________
Mutations:

White tigers are Bengal Tigers whose fur colour is white with brown stripes rather than orange and black. They only survive in captivity, because their white colour would make it easy for animals to see them, so they would fail in hunts or when trying to hide.
They are white from a similair gene to the White Lion. They can only be born white when both parents have the rare gene that makes tigers white - only one in 10,000 births have a baby white tiger.

Strawberry tigers, or Golden Tabby tigers, are even rarer. There are 30 in total, all living in zoos. They have light gold fur, pale legs and faint orange stripes, and their fur tends to be much thicker than normal. They have the White Tiger gene, and when two mate they can have albino babies with no stripes.

The Maltese Tiger, or Blue Tiger are the rarest of them all. There have been a few reported sightings since 1910.

______________________
Wikipedia wrote: In the wild, tigers mostly feed on larger and medium sized animals. Sambar, gaur, chital, wild boar, nilgai and both water buffalo and domestic buffalo are the tiger's favored prey in India. Sometimes, they also prey on leopards, pythons, sloth bears and crocodiles. In Siberia the main prey species are manchurian wapiti, wild boar, sika deer, moose, roe deer, and musk deer. In Sumatra Sambar, muntjac, wild boar, and malayan tapir are preyed on. In the former Caspian tiger's range, prey included saiga antelope, camels, caucasian wisent, yak, and wild horses. Like many predators, they are opportunistic and will eat much smaller prey, such as monkeys, peafowls, hares, and fish.

Adult elephants are too large to serve as common prey, but conflicts between tigers and elephants do sometimes take place. A case where a tiger killed an adult Indian Rhinoceros has been observed.[55] Young elephant and rhino calves are occasionally taken. Tigers also sometimes prey on domestic animals such as dogs, cows, horses, and donkeys. These individuals are termed cattle-lifters or cattle-killers in contrast to typical game-killers.
Is something missing on the menu? You might think they're humans. But actually, tigers don't "hunt" humans when they're hungry. So why do tigers attack humans?
Wikipedia wrote:Old tigers, or those wounded and rendered incapable of catching their natural prey, have turned into man-eaters; this pattern has recurred frequently across India. An exceptional case is that of the Sundarbans, where healthy tigers prey upon fishermen and villagers in search of forest produce, humans thereby forming a minor part of the tiger's diet.Tigers will occasionally eat vegetation for dietary fiber, the fruit of the Slow Match Tree being favoured.
Wikipedia wrote:Man-eating tigers
Main article: Man-eating tigers

Although humans are not regular prey for tigers, they have killed more people than any other cat, particularly in areas where population growth, logging, and farming have put pressure on tiger habitats. Most man-eating tigers are old and missing teeth, acquiring a taste for humans because of their inability to capture preferred prey.[94] Almost all tigers that are identified as man-eaters are quickly captured, shot, or poisoned. Unlike man-eating leopards, even established man-eating tigers will seldom enter human settlements, usually remaining at village outskirts.[95] Nevertheless, attacks in human villages do occur.[96] Man-eaters have been a particular problem in India and Bangladesh, especially in Kumaon, Garhwal and the Sundarbans mangrove swamps of Bengal, where some healthy tigers have been known to hunt humans. Because of rapid habitat loss due to climate change, tiger attacks have increased in the Sundarbans
Wikipedia wrote: Reasons for attacking

Tigers are sometimes intimidated from attacking humans, especially if they are unfamiliar with people. Unlike man-eating leopards, even established man-eating tigers will seldom enter human settlements, usually sticking to village outskirts.[1] Nevertheless, attacks in human villages do occur.
Tigers are typically wary of humans and have shown no preference for human meat. Although humans are relatively easy prey, we are not a desired source of food. Most tigers will only attack a human if they cannot physically satisfy their needs otherwise. Thus, most man-eating tigers are old, infirm or have missing teeth. In one case, a post-mortem examination of a killed tigress revealed two broken canine teeth, four missing incisors and a loose upper molar, handicaps which make capturing more standard prey extremely difficult. Only once reaching this stage did she attack a workman.
Taste for human flesh may be acquired by the consumption of corpses which have lain unburied. During the Vietnam and Korean wars, soldiers became the victims of tigers who had acquired a taste for human flesh in this way.[1] Tigers will stalk groups of people bending down while working in a field or cutting grass, but will lose interest as soon as the people stand upright. Consequently, it has been hypothesized that some attacks are a simple case of mistaken identity.
Tigers typically surprise victims from the side or from behind: either approaching upwind or lying in wait downwind. Tigers rarely press an attack if they are seen before their ambush is mounted.
Kenneth Anderson once commented on man eating tigers;
It is extraordinary how very cautious every man-eater becomes by practice, whether a tiger or panther, and cowardly too. Invariably, it will only attack a solitary person, and that too, after prolonged and painstaking stalking, having assured itself that no other human being is in the immediate vicinity... These animals seem also to possess an astute sixth sense and be able to differentiate between an unarmed human being and an armed man deliberately pursuing them, for in most cases, only when cornered will they venture to attack the latter, while they go out of their way to stalk and attack the unarmed man.
Last edited by Kivia on Wed Sep 14, 2011 9:28 pm, edited 3 times in total.
Reason: Changing title to be more generic
Stop copying.Be creative.

Mezzanota:

» UF Member
» WQ Writer
» Tiger Lover
»Avatar (c) Nightshadows (thankyou!)
» ♣I support Green Paws♣

Songdog
Former WQ Moderator
Posts: 3587
Joined: Sun Sep 16, 2007 5:43 pm
Gender: Other
Location: Czechosylvania

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Songdog » Mon Jul 06, 2009 8:33 pm

Mezzanota wrote:
Scary, evil tigers, hmm? Since 1900 in India, there have been 30,000 human deaths by tigers. But it is the humans who are evil. Everyday, maybe even every hour, a species of animal is made extinct, by humans. People might find it cruel and gruesome that animals kill each other, but in only WW1 (World War One) and WW2 (world war two) millions and millions of people died.

I don't find it cruel when a predator kills a herbivore/an omnivore. You might think that a deer is an "innocent, beautiful creature" that shouldn't be hunted down by tigers or wolves or whatever, but if there were no predators in the world, then the herbivores would eat all the plants, and then they would starve, plants would die out, we'd die, etc.



So next time you see a tiger in a zoo, would you start taunting it and throwing things at it, or would you feel sorry that a beautiful animal is held in captivity and isn't free and wild, hunting and breeding as it wishes?


You can keep this topic open, but please remove or change these segments. We want to avoid topics that bash humans for being "evil". You suggest that every human out there is war-loving and sadistic, with no concern fro the world around them. You forget that there are millions of people who support animals and dedicate their lives to helping them.

If you are going to have an informative topic about tigers, then make it informative, and keep your bias out. This isn't a debate over whether humans are good or evil. Keep politics and war out of this topic, and remove any anti-human or misanthropic statements made, or I will lock this topic.

User avatar
Mezzanota
Adult Wolf
Adult Wolf
Posts: 1082
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2008 11:21 am
Gender: Female
Location: In your head

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Mezzanota » Tue Jul 07, 2009 1:34 am

OK, I took it off, sorry.
Stop copying.Be creative.

Mezzanota:

» UF Member
» WQ Writer
» Tiger Lover
»Avatar (c) Nightshadows (thankyou!)
» ♣I support Green Paws♣

User avatar
pawnee
Former WQ Moderator
Posts: 2483
Joined: Fri Jul 27, 2007 4:05 pm
Location: the far north
Contact:

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by pawnee » Fri Jul 10, 2009 7:49 pm

I like tigers. supposily if your charged by a tiger you shoulnd't run...but then agian it would be hard not too.

I`m sure the thing about tigers attacking only from behind is faulse. A 500 pound big cat will do just as she pleases with her prey...
My Wolf Art http://pawnee.deviantart.com/
Its Not the Size of the dog in the fight, Its the size of the fight in the dog-Mark Twain

Sintact
Guest
Guest

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Sintact » Fri Jul 10, 2009 8:05 pm

Tigers are my second favorite animal, they are such magestic creatures. Thanks for all the information posted, I'll try to google some more and post it here later.

User avatar
Blightwolf
New Pack Member
New Pack Member
Posts: 3478
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2008 5:20 am

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Blightwolf » Sat Jul 11, 2009 6:02 am

Tigers are beautiful and mystical, and their reputation as human killers and man-eaters, I think, is a more production of imagination and old wives tales. Though, why should I deny the fact that tigers have been attacking humans, because it's documented, but do I believe that a tiger would kill a man to eat them? No.

Tigers are wild animals as much as wolves and bears are. And wolves and bears have also attacked humans, but not to feast upon them.
It's a protective instincts. Animals do not behave the same way humans do. Our body movement they may see as a threat or an hostile gesture and it would provoke their instinct to attack you. This is my theory.
AUGUST 2009 USER OF THE MONTH

User avatar
Mezzanota
Adult Wolf
Adult Wolf
Posts: 1082
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2008 11:21 am
Gender: Female
Location: In your head

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Mezzanota » Sat Jul 11, 2009 11:23 am

Embry wrote:Tigers are beautiful and mystical, and their reputation as human killers and man-eaters, I think, is a more production of imagination and old wives tales. Though, why should I deny the fact that tigers have been attacking humans, because it's documented, but do I believe that a tiger would kill a man to eat them? No.

Tigers are wild animals as much as wolves and bears are. And wolves and bears have also attacked humans, but not to feast upon them.
It's a protective instincts. Animals do not behave the same way humans do. Our body movement they may see as a threat or an hostile gesture and it would provoke their instinct to attack you. This is my theory.
I believe the same, but I didn't know how to post that tigers aren't mindless man-killers, because under all those fairy tales, claws, teeth and muscles is a warm heart.

Any animal which has killed a human or at the very least attacked one is killed. But if a human murdered someone else, usually they simply go to jail for a few years then are let out, feeling free to live a great life if they wanted. How fair is that?
Stop copying.Be creative.

Mezzanota:

» UF Member
» WQ Writer
» Tiger Lover
»Avatar (c) Nightshadows (thankyou!)
» ♣I support Green Paws♣

User avatar
April
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 2597
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:23 pm
Gender: Female
Location: In the midst of a storm
Contact:

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by April » Sat Jul 11, 2009 11:24 am

I love tigers. You can't just say they are man eating beasts. Because lots of animals out there are dangerous. Besides, it's just as well as you call bears man eating beasts than tigers.
Avatar by me. Read my book Lessons Learned (A fiction book about African Wild Dogs) at:

http://aprilsilverwolf.wix.com/lessonslearnednovel

~April~
~Member Of The Month for October of 2009~
Yellowstone wolf international/Skilled Hunter

Snow Powder Runs Pack

Sintact
Guest
Guest

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Sintact » Sat Jul 11, 2009 11:28 am

Animals are not man killers, it's just us that are messing with them and beleiving we can reduce their space whenever we want. I understand tigers and other animals that attack us since we are such a stupid race e_o (no offense, I'm talking of some people that is not here xD).

They are not killers, they just have strong instincts. If I were one of them and they have me in a cage all day long, I would react the same way as them, being aggressive and wanting some time alone, at the end. Who likes to be stared all day long and have weird noises around you 24 hours a day? (refering to zoos)

User avatar
April
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 2597
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:23 pm
Gender: Female
Location: In the midst of a storm
Contact:

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by April » Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:03 pm

But I've seen some tv shows where people are walking in the jungle and then tigers attack and kill them and not only that but they eat them too. >.> I don't think they are "mankillers" I just think that they think we are prey like another other kind of animal.
Avatar by me. Read my book Lessons Learned (A fiction book about African Wild Dogs) at:

http://aprilsilverwolf.wix.com/lessonslearnednovel

~April~
~Member Of The Month for October of 2009~
Yellowstone wolf international/Skilled Hunter

Snow Powder Runs Pack

Sintact
Guest
Guest

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Sintact » Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:07 pm

Of course, those are their instinct calling, anyways, what are people doing walking at the half of the jungle alone? XD I have seen some programs like that and videos about it. They might get confused with their prey. But it's easy to avoid a tiger attack, from what I have read, if you use a mask at your back they won't attack since they think that the surprise attack was a fail.

User avatar
April
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 2597
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:23 pm
Gender: Female
Location: In the midst of a storm
Contact:

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by April » Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:09 pm

Yeah, I also heard that tigers will rarely attack you from the front so people down there have been wearing masks on the backs of their heads so that the tigers won't attack. It's worked for a little while, but I hear that the tigers are starting to figure it out. X3 Just some video I saw. lol
Avatar by me. Read my book Lessons Learned (A fiction book about African Wild Dogs) at:

http://aprilsilverwolf.wix.com/lessonslearnednovel

~April~
~Member Of The Month for October of 2009~
Yellowstone wolf international/Skilled Hunter

Snow Powder Runs Pack

User avatar
Mezzanota
Adult Wolf
Adult Wolf
Posts: 1082
Joined: Tue Nov 04, 2008 11:21 am
Gender: Female
Location: In your head

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Mezzanota » Sun Jul 12, 2009 12:46 am

I posted this mainly directed to people who don't understand tigers. I used to be terrified of tigers and lions when I was 3 or 4, but when I learned about poachers and hunters and whatever, I suddenly felt sorry for them.

It's because it's people who all they know about tigers is that they have striped fur and are powerful are the ones who get scared the most. If we learn more about animals, how to approach them safely and what to do if one sees you, then there will be less deaths from them, either from humans or animals.

I believe the world will be a much poorer place, if we wake up and see no animals. I believe grasses will grow at such a rate that human's can't live, even their machines won't be enough or will destroy all the plants. When that happens, humans will die out, too, and humans would have brought themselves to extinction.

There's a DVD you could get called TIger: Spy in the jungle about a tigress who has had her first litter of cubs and how she raises them and lives.
Here is the link to the video:
Stop copying.Be creative.

Mezzanota:

» UF Member
» WQ Writer
» Tiger Lover
»Avatar (c) Nightshadows (thankyou!)
» ♣I support Green Paws♣

User avatar
Blightwolf
New Pack Member
New Pack Member
Posts: 3478
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2008 5:20 am

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Blightwolf » Sun Jul 12, 2009 5:51 am

Sintact wrote:Animals are not man killers, it's just us that are messing with them and beleiving we can reduce their space whenever we want. I understand tigers and other animals that attack us since we are such a stupid race e_o (no offense, I'm talking of some people that is not here xD).

They are not killers, they just have strong instincts. If I were one of them and they have me in a cage all day long, I would react the same way as them, being aggressive and wanting some time alone, at the end. Who likes to be stared all day long and have weird noises around you 24 hours a day? (refering to zoos)
I agree with Sintact 100%. Animal mind is not the same as humans. Their senses are so much move developed than ours. They see this world differently than us humans do. Animals rely on their instincts, and most of the humans think we can start messing with that; it's so wrong.

And of course, we're talking about wild animals. Tiger is not a fluffy domestic cat, and it should never be treated with a lack of respect (or even a proper amount of fear) towards it.

And what Sintact said about zoos, I agree on that, too. All though most of the animals must have gotten accustomed to all the noises and camera flashes and all the other weird sounds, it must be stressing and exhausting.
AUGUST 2009 USER OF THE MONTH

User avatar
Switch
Hunter-in-training
Hunter-in-training
Posts: 173
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2009 9:45 am

Re: Tigers: Majestic Creatures or Man-eating Beasts?

Post by Switch » Sun Jul 12, 2009 6:00 am

I adore Tigers.

The Tiger is my horoscope,and I would be devastated if the tiger died out because of man's cruel judgement's. Tiger's are beutiful creaturs and when they attack people it is because they may be scared of the human or they want to protect something. They do not deserve to die out at all,like almost every other animal. Many stories have been told of Zookeepers killing their Tigers because of an attack when the tiger was doing only what it thought right. I always thought humans should only keep animals in captivity to help raise their numbers and set them back in the wild. I love zoos,no deny. But they put animals in cages and try to forget they are animals..

Post Reply

Return to “Nature & Wildlife”