Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by DaniBeez » Wed Mar 07, 2018 12:07 am

That answered my question, thanks! I remembered you talking about releasing them, so that's what I wondered might be happening.

Over the summer, do you still fly him at all for exercise? Or is that not a thing.
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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by paperpaws » Thu Mar 08, 2018 8:48 pm

Ahh, I'm glad to hear you'll get to spend some more time with him despite the season being over. This whole thing seems to have gone by so fast, and he sounds like a pretty defining part of your life. It would be strange to have to let that go, although I understand that's inevitable.

If he happens to get his red tail before you release him, I'd love to see some pictures!

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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by alethe » Thu Mar 08, 2018 8:51 pm

of course! y'all will get to see his lovely tail
he's also having a dentist appointment on sunday so I might post some behind the scenes beak trimming


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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by krispycat9 » Mon Dec 24, 2018 5:31 pm

Ahh I see you pulled a Zelda reference there with the name ;). Falconry is always something I’ve been interested in and if I can find myself a sponsor it’d be a dream come true for me! Unfortunately the falconry club in my state is very small, so it’s going to be difficult to find one. Do you have any tips for getting a sponsor? Thank you for posting this, it’s really cool!

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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by alethe » Fri Jun 21, 2019 10:46 am

krispycat9 wrote:
Mon Dec 24, 2018 5:31 pm
Ahh I see you pulled a Zelda reference there with the name ;). Falconry is always something I’ve been interested in and if I can find myself a sponsor it’d be a dream come true for me! Unfortunately the falconry club in my state is very small, so it’s going to be difficult to find one. Do you have any tips for getting a sponsor? Thank you for posting this, it’s really cool!

deeply sorry for not replying sooner! i mostly abandoned wq when i moved to college. i will try to keep up with my falconry threads though, for all you interested parties :>

the state club is the best place to start. most of the time they know who's looking for an apprentice. go to the state meets, if you can, go hunting with people. ask questions. get involved. if you're on facebook, some groups i recommend:
Falconry Hub (worldwide)
Texas Falconry Apprentices (texas based, but one of the bEST groups to join)
there is also an american falconry apprentices page, but i can't seem to find it quickly right now. there's quite a few others, search falconry and JOIN them! post there! ask questions! find people in your area. keep in mind, the nearest sponsor might be in the next state over (i'm closer to most new mexican falconers than i am to texas falconers)

if you don't have a facebook.... alas. if you're serious about finding a sponsor you need one. most falconers are older and still use facebook as primary social media, if they use it at all. my sponsor uses fb, but he's hardly ever on.

basically, people aren't going to come to you. you have to come to them, show them you're committed in learning the craft.

NOW THEN, as far as where i'm at.

i released rev shortly after the molt. Here he is sporting his red tail.

i trapped a female red tail i called jadzia. she was horrible. a real piece of work. her in all of her gross-ness

she was extremely violent and didn't want anything to do with me. eventually, i decided to free fly her. she didn't come back. disappointing, but sometimes these birds aren't meant for this. i know she's still out there. she was a survivor. massive female, 1300g off the trap. would try to kill the cat. tried to kill the dog. tried to kill the me.

i just applied for my general permit and will hopefully be upgraded in a few weeks. at that point i will set out to go find a kestrel. change it up a bit.


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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by Mwitu » Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:44 pm

Hopefully this thread is still active enough for me to learn a bit more.

I've always had a deep fascination with falconry. I've done a good bit of research but sadly have not had the luck of being able to get a hawk for myself. It was nice to see a couple websites I had visited on there.

I assume Revali has been gone for a little while, but he's amazing anyway!

As for the questions...

What birds of prey are you legally allowed to own and when? I've always been curious. I heard that you're able to start with either a red-tailed hawk or a kestrel as an apprentice, but I have heard conflicting information occasionally. I've also heard a couple things about Harris Hawks, but those were less often mentioned (I think one website mentioned those being potentially legal for apprentices soon, but it was fairly outdated and as far as I know one can't legally keep one until one is a general falconer, so maybe that law didn't get passed).

I've also heard conflicting information about a test you have to take to become an apprentice in the first place and having to score 80% to pass or something. Is this a qualification? It's been mentioned several times, but other times I've heard that you can just ask a sponsor to start training you. I assume it's the former, though.

How often should you go hunting with your bird?

What are the limitations of what a bird can hunt in regards to size? For instance, I would assume that a kestrel couldn't even try to go after a rabbit but a hawk could definitely hunt one.

Sorry, quite a few questions. If you're busy, there's no need to keep the thread alive for my sake. I felt a strong need to post here due to my obsession with the notion of falconry. Hopefully one day I'll be able to get my first hawk...

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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by alethe » Sun Dec 22, 2019 10:28 am

Mwitu wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:44 pm
Hopefully this thread is still active enough for me to learn a bit more.

I've always had a deep fascination with falconry. I've done a good bit of research but sadly have not had the luck of being able to get a hawk for myself. It was nice to see a couple websites I had visited on there.

I assume Revali has been gone for a little while, but he's amazing anyway!

As for the questions...

1) What birds of prey are you legally allowed to own and when? I've always been curious. I heard that you're able to start with either a red-tailed hawk or a kestrel as an apprentice, but I have heard conflicting information occasionally. I've also heard a couple things about Harris Hawks, but those were less often mentioned (I think one website mentioned those being potentially legal for apprentices soon, but it was fairly outdated and as far as I know one can't legally keep one until one is a general falconer, so maybe that law didn't get passed).

2) I've also heard conflicting information about a test you have to take to become an apprentice in the first place and having to score 80% to pass or something. Is this a qualification? It's been mentioned several times, but other times I've heard that you can just ask a sponsor to start training you. I assume it's the former, though.

3) How often should you go hunting with your bird?

4) What are the limitations of what a bird can hunt in regards to size? For instance, I would assume that a kestrel couldn't even try to go after a rabbit but a hawk could definitely hunt one.

Sorry, quite a few questions. If you're busy, there's no need to keep the thread alive for my sake. I felt a strong need to post here due to my obsession with the notion of falconry. Hopefully one day I'll be able to get my first hawk...
Hello! As you can see, I am not as active on WQ as I used to be, so deeply sorry for not replying sooner. I went ahead and numbered your questions so I can answer them easier!

1) This varies state to state. In Texas, where I'm based, an apprentice can have any bird caught from the wild save for anything threatened or endangered, or an eagle. In other states, apprentices MUST start with a red-tail (RT) or kestrel. in Texas you can keep a harris as apprentice! your sponsor will go over what they want you to have.

2) yes, the test is required before you can legally have a permit and begin advancing to your general permit. some sponsors, like mine, let me help handle his birds before i passed my exam. that is a case to case basis, and time spend doing that doesn't count to your two year apprenticeship requirement.

3) depends on the bird. RTs and harrises you can get away with once or twice a week. Falcons require more. every day or every few days is greatly preferred, since you really aren't doing the bird a service by keeping it locked up all week.

4) they are mostly limited to the quarry they can take in the wild. so yeah, no rabbit hunting kestrels.


_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ⋯⋯⋯_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
I eat danger for breakfast!
Actually, I don’t. I prefer cereal.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ⋯⋯⋯_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by Mwitu » Sat Dec 28, 2019 5:34 pm

alethe wrote:
Sun Dec 22, 2019 10:28 am
Mwitu wrote:
Tue Dec 03, 2019 7:44 pm
Hopefully this thread is still active enough for me to learn a bit more.

I've always had a deep fascination with falconry. I've done a good bit of research but sadly have not had the luck of being able to get a hawk for myself. It was nice to see a couple websites I had visited on there.

I assume Revali has been gone for a little while, but he's amazing anyway!

As for the questions...

1) What birds of prey are you legally allowed to own and when? I've always been curious. I heard that you're able to start with either a red-tailed hawk or a kestrel as an apprentice, but I have heard conflicting information occasionally. I've also heard a couple things about Harris Hawks, but those were less often mentioned (I think one website mentioned those being potentially legal for apprentices soon, but it was fairly outdated and as far as I know one can't legally keep one until one is a general falconer, so maybe that law didn't get passed).

2) I've also heard conflicting information about a test you have to take to become an apprentice in the first place and having to score 80% to pass or something. Is this a qualification? It's been mentioned several times, but other times I've heard that you can just ask a sponsor to start training you. I assume it's the former, though.

3) How often should you go hunting with your bird?

4) What are the limitations of what a bird can hunt in regards to size? For instance, I would assume that a kestrel couldn't even try to go after a rabbit but a hawk could definitely hunt one.

Sorry, quite a few questions. If you're busy, there's no need to keep the thread alive for my sake. I felt a strong need to post here due to my obsession with the notion of falconry. Hopefully one day I'll be able to get my first hawk...
Hello! As you can see, I am not as active on WQ as I used to be, so deeply sorry for not replying sooner. I went ahead and numbered your questions so I can answer them easier!

1) This varies state to state. In Texas, where I'm based, an apprentice can have any bird caught from the wild save for anything threatened or endangered, or an eagle. In other states, apprentices MUST start with a red-tail (RT) or kestrel. in Texas you can keep a harris as apprentice! your sponsor will go over what they want you to have.

2) yes, the test is required before you can legally have a permit and begin advancing to your general permit. some sponsors, like mine, let me help handle his birds before i passed my exam. that is a case to case basis, and time spend doing that doesn't count to your two year apprenticeship requirement.

3) depends on the bird. RTs and harrises you can get away with once or twice a week. Falcons require more. every day or every few days is greatly preferred, since you really aren't doing the bird a service by keeping it locked up all week.

4) they are mostly limited to the quarry they can take in the wild. so yeah, no rabbit hunting kestrels.
It's fine; there's no rush (unfortunately :| ). Thanks for the response!

1) Ah, varies by state. That makes sense.

2) That's good to know. Actually, one thing I forgot to ask; are there two years of studying required before you're allowed to get an apprentice permit (thus being able to get your first bird), or can you have a bird and study falconry simultaneously? That is, are the two years of studying required to have the privilege of getting a bird and earning the apprentice permit, or are they required to become a general falconer and "graduate" apprenticeship?

3) Interesting! I've heard multiple things about exercise and hunting requirements for them, like three hours on three different days of the week when it's the right season...

4) Great, thanks! (I'm finding it difficult to communicate via number-points, so my last response there was rather odd.)

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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by alethe » Sun Jan 26, 2020 5:31 pm

Mwitu wrote:
Sat Dec 28, 2019 5:34 pm
It's fine; there's no rush (unfortunately :| ). Thanks for the response!

1) Ah, varies by state. That makes sense.

2) That's good to know. Actually, one thing I forgot to ask; are there two years of studying required before you're allowed to get an apprentice permit (thus being able to get your first bird), or can you have a bird and study falconry simultaneously? That is, are the two years of studying required to have the privilege of getting a bird and earning the apprentice permit, or are they required to become a general falconer and "graduate" apprenticeship?

3) Interesting! I've heard multiple things about exercise and hunting requirements for them, like three hours on three different days of the week when it's the right season...

4) Great, thanks! (I'm finding it difficult to communicate via number-points, so my last response there was rather odd.)
Ah! Okay, I see where you can get confused here. So in the US, there are a few things you must do to get your permit. You must first find a mentor, build your enclosure. But you also have to take an exam. That exam is 100 questions, 80% required to pass, and covers husbandry, training, etc. There's no legal time you can take to "study" for it. You can literally just walk in and wing it if you want (not recommended). Once those three items are done, then you can get your first bird and learn practical skills with them. One doesn't really "study" falconry in my experience, nor are you ever done. You're always learning, and your "studying" is done through hunting, training, and caring for your bird, if that makes sense.

You'll hear multiple things about everything in falconry. Some of the advice you'll get is good. Some is bad. It is important to remember that your mentor will give you the advice they want you to follow, but also follow your gut on some calls. Just because something worked for one bird doesn't mean it will work for another (and I learned this lesson the hard way by trying to train a nasty female red-tail like a calm male). Falconers are constantly disagreeing with what is right and wrong. In the end, you and your mentor will know what's best for your bird, not a ton of people on the internet who have never met your bird and were taught a hundred different methods.


_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ⋯⋯⋯_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
I eat danger for breakfast!
Actually, I don’t. I prefer cereal.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ⋯⋯⋯_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


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Re: Falconry -- Hunting With a Bird of Prey

Post by Mwitu » Tue Feb 11, 2020 5:58 pm

alethe wrote:
Sun Jan 26, 2020 5:31 pm
Mwitu wrote:
Sat Dec 28, 2019 5:34 pm
It's fine; there's no rush (unfortunately :| ). Thanks for the response!

1) Ah, varies by state. That makes sense.

2) That's good to know. Actually, one thing I forgot to ask; are there two years of studying required before you're allowed to get an apprentice permit (thus being able to get your first bird), or can you have a bird and study falconry simultaneously? That is, are the two years of studying required to have the privilege of getting a bird and earning the apprentice permit, or are they required to become a general falconer and "graduate" apprenticeship?

3) Interesting! I've heard multiple things about exercise and hunting requirements for them, like three hours on three different days of the week when it's the right season...

4) Great, thanks! (I'm finding it difficult to communicate via number-points, so my last response there was rather odd.)
Ah! Okay, I see where you can get confused here. So in the US, there are a few things you must do to get your permit. You must first find a mentor, build your enclosure. But you also have to take an exam. That exam is 100 questions, 80% required to pass, and covers husbandry, training, etc. There's no legal time you can take to "study" for it. You can literally just walk in and wing it if you want (not recommended). Once those three items are done, then you can get your first bird and learn practical skills with them. One doesn't really "study" falconry in my experience, nor are you ever done. You're always learning, and your "studying" is done through hunting, training, and caring for your bird, if that makes sense.

You'll hear multiple things about everything in falconry. Some of the advice you'll get is good. Some is bad. It is important to remember that your mentor will give you the advice they want you to follow, but also follow your gut on some calls. Just because something worked for one bird doesn't mean it will work for another (and I learned this lesson the hard way by trying to train a nasty female red-tail like a calm male). Falconers are constantly disagreeing with what is right and wrong. In the end, you and your mentor will know what's best for your bird, not a ton of people on the internet who have never met your bird and were taught a hundred different methods.
That's exciting news, thanks! And how convenient, to learn as you go along.

I was starting to tell myself I'd better move it and start "legally studying," whatever that would mean, lest I stumble upon a good opportunity to start falconry and lose it two years later. What a relief!

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