"Eastern Coy-Wolves" | General Discussion

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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by -Sheeba » Thu Nov 24, 2011 1:44 am

I don't mind at all! However, I'm not entirely sure of the answer to this particular question. Usually the packs they hunt in are fairly small, so my best guess is that they don't have dominate rankings and simply hunt together to better take down prey and also possibly for a form of protection. Though with the larger packs, which are few, there may be some form of dominant system, but I'm not sure.
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by BlackWarrior » Thu Nov 24, 2011 6:29 pm

Thanks for answering what you could. I have been made practically an expert myself now. ;)
Thanks again! I may have more questions in the future! ^^
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by -Sheeba » Thu Nov 24, 2011 7:08 pm

You're welcome! I look forward to answering any future questions, if I can answer them, that is ;)
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by BlackWarrior » Fri Nov 25, 2011 12:32 pm

Well, I'm back with another question:
Where are coy-wolves found?
And can they be found in Canada?

I live in Canada and it isn't all that unusual for us to have coyotes around her. If we move farther west, there are wolves as well. In winter here, I have seen many large canine like creatures. They are the colors of a coyote but very large. Here coyotes can be large especially with their winter fur, although, is it possible that what I saw was a coy-wolf?
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by -Sheeba » Fri Nov 25, 2011 5:34 pm

I'm only familiar with the coywolves here in Newfoundland, but I'm sure that they can be found in other areas in Canada (perhaps even as far as in places in the U.S.), since wolves and coyotes are capable of breeding with each other wherever they come into contact, of course. Therefore, I would think it is very possible what you've seen could have been a coywolf, indeed.

An interesting fact that I'd like to share; there are absolutely no wolves to be found in Newfoundland, which makes the case of the coywolves being found here all the more interesting. What is believed to have happened is that the coywolves (and plain coyotes, too) came across on the ice from Labrador to northern Newfoundland and spread from there. There actually were wolves here a long time ago, commonly known as the plain "Newfoundland wolf", which were white in color and native to Newfoundland, but unfortunately were killed off to extinction for their pelts as well as a means to eliminate the farming issues they brought.
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by BlackWarrior » Sun Nov 27, 2011 3:47 am

Hmm. How interesting. ^^ thanks for sharing Sheeba! Again! Also, thanks for answering my question, I dont look at large coyotes the same anymore.. ^^
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by Coytee » Wed Nov 30, 2011 10:22 am

Oooh Coy-wolves :D really interesting! Thanks for sharing this with us BlackWarrior! And thanks for the Picture Sheeba! It's so adorable C:

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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by failwolf56 » Wed Nov 30, 2011 3:13 pm

Hey Sheeba, since they seem to live in Newfoundland, do you think they might also be living in the North Eastern parts of the U.S. Possibly in New England, or even Vermont?
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by -Sheeba » Wed Nov 30, 2011 6:55 pm

I'm glad you enjoyed the photo, Coytee! Very cute, indeed c:

And failwolf, as I noted in a previous post here, I would assume that any area where coyotes and wolves interact together would be capable of producing coywolves if the two animals ever bred successfully. Whether or not the coywolf population would eventually grow to what it's known here in Newfoundland, or if it would just be a rare occurrence is certainly a debatable topic and definitely something to think about yourself :3
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by BlackWarrior » Wed Nov 30, 2011 11:35 pm

I do believe I saw a coy-wolf just the other day out in our field. It was a huge bulky coyote looking canine but coyotes around here usually aren't that big.. I should ha e taken a photo but ran off in the trees before I had time. ^^
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by -Sheeba » Fri Dec 02, 2011 2:19 pm

Very cool to hear about your encounter, BlackWarrior! It's always fun to think that it may have been a coywolf, even if there's a chance it was just a regular coyote x3
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves"

Post by BlackWarrior » Sat Dec 03, 2011 11:52 pm

It actually is quite cool. Beside the fact that it could have been an everyday coyote.. ^^

>> I found this fact article about coywolves. It gives some interesting information.

"When Two Become One"

New coyote-wolf hybrid disseminating across North America


As we draw closer to the proclaimed “end of days” in 2012, we wonder: what could possibly survive a devastating blow to all living life on Earth? Sure, we all know of the resistance of a cockroach, but we can now add a new species to that list.

Eastern coyotes, or “coywolves,” are a new developing species that has been proliferating across North America. Said to have originated when coyotes expanded eastward to the Great Lakes, recent DNA evidence from West Virginia provides evidence that coywolves are becoming more prevalent along the Atlantic coast and are spreading to other parts of the Unites States and Canada. Evidence indicates that coywolves are the result of a hybridization between wolves and coyotes. Taller than a coyote but smaller than a wolf, the hybrid has gained all the best attributes of both wolf and coyote, making it a formidable survivor.

Unlike in other hybridizations, such as mules — a crossing of horses and donkeys — the coyote-wolf is fertile.

One especially advantageous trait retained by the hybrid is a gargantuan pair of jaws at its disposal. A regular sized coywolf can prey on larger animals, such as deer — something a regular coyote would be incapable of doing.

Their adaptability is also displayed by their complete fearlessness of humans and human-developed areas, a trait inherited from coyotes. This audacity has proved problematic, as some coywolves can be unwilling to compromise. Farmers bear the brunt of this behavioural trait, their livestock raided by animals that are described as “bigger, bolder and smarter than regular coyotes.”

If the coywolves adaptability drives them deeper into more urbanized areas, the potential for human-coywolf interaction will increase and could be dangerous.

But what does the increasing presence of this new creature spell for the ever-disappearing wolf? Coywolves are a direct cause of the decrease in population of wolves in North America. In the past, the wolf was simply content on making the coyote its prey and dinner, but as populations dwindled, the male wolf has had no choice but to make partial peace with the female coyote for its own intentions of passing on its genes. The male wolf couldn’t afford to be choosy about its partners anymore. As the population of coywolves expand, it will provide more mating competition for the wolf species. Who knows if the wolves will continue to survive, but as Brendan Kelly, a research biologist with the U.S. National Marine Mammal Laboratory in Alaska, puts it: hybridization “can be the final straw in loss of species.”

This isn’t the first North American predator species to be hybridized. The awkwardly named “pizzly” or “grolar bear” is a cross between the polar bear and closely related grizzly bear, and occurs when a grizzly bear ventures far up north or in places where the two’s territories overlap. But unlike the coywolf, the pizzly bear’s odd physical appearance makes it an outcast from either species and less likely to past on its genes.

The coywolf is a relatively new species that is showing an ability to last in the environment. With its increase in population across the eastern United States, coywolves have shown that in an era where animals are increasingly going extinct, a minority are adapting, finding new form through hybridization.


Source

>> http://www.themanitoban.com/articles/49807
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves" | General Discussion

Post by -Sheeba » Mon Dec 05, 2011 9:40 pm

Hmm, another interesting article you have found here, BlackWarrior! Thank you for sharing it with us, it's always great to hear a more professional outlook on this unique animal C:
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves" | General Discussion

Post by BlackWarrior » Tue Dec 06, 2011 11:48 pm

-Sheeba wrote:Hmm, another interesting article you have found here, BlackWarrior! Thank you for sharing it with us, it's always great to hear a more professional outlook on this unique animal C:

I agree. ^^ also I'm keeping my eyes open for news articles and updates on coywolves since they are spreading quite fast. :3
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Re: "Eastern Coy-Wolves" | General Discussion

Post by CaptainSpenny » Tue Dec 11, 2012 11:49 am

We have Coy-Wolves here in Ontario and they are not fun, basically the varmintness of a coyote and the aggressiveness of a wolf. They have bred and bred and gotten closer to homes now in the small neighborhood I live in out in the forest. There is a lot of construction going on but they are everywhere. The town put 3 cougars into the forest but they aren't helping, It may sound cruel but I had to put some to rest. We have signs everywhere saying missing pets and a 12 year old boy was attacked by one a week ago. Not nice things at all

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